Advanced Engineering Materials

Cover image for Vol. 14 Issue 3

March 2012

Volume 14, Issue 3

Pages 131–206

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Editorial
    8. Invited Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    1. Front Cover Advanced Materials 3/2012

      Nousha Kheradmand and Horst Vehoff

      Version of Record online: 5 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201290010

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover shows the analysis of the EBSD measurement on the cross section of the pillar indicates local misorientations. In the right grain with single slip orientation the dislocation density decreases to the pillar free surface, since the dislocations reach the crystal free surface and therewith creating a zone of depleted dislocation. In contrast, they are hindered to move while approaching the GB and pile up there. Further details can be found in the article by N. Kheradmand et. al. on page 153.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Editorial
    8. Invited Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    1. Front Cover Advanced Materials 3/2012

      Xiaohong Wang, Matthias Wiens, Ute Schloßmacher, Klaus Peter Jochum, Heinz C. Schröder and Werner E. G. Müller

      Version of Record online: 5 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201290011

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      The cover shows some siliceous sponge spicules, like the 30μm spheroidal asters from the demosponge Geodia cydonium, which are composed of an array of a vast number of small rod-like pillars that fused (bio-sintered) together to the porous sphere. More details can be found in the article by W.E.G. Müller et al. on page B4.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Editorial
    8. Invited Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    1. Adv. Eng. Mater. 3/2012

      Version of Record online: 5 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201290012

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Editorial
    8. Invited Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    1. Adv. Eng. Mater. 3/2012 (pages 131–137)

      Version of Record online: 5 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201290009

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Editorial
    8. Invited Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    1. In Situ TEM Investigations on Thermoelectric Bi2Te3/Sb2Te3 Multilayers (pages 139–143)

      Ulrich Schürmann, Markus Winkler, Jan D. König, Xi Liu, Viola Duppel, Wolfgang Bensch, Harald Böttner and Lorenz Kienle

      Version of Record online: 21 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100209

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      The impact of ex situ and in situ (FIB lamella in TEM) heat treatment (250 °C) on the real structure of Bi2Te3/Sb2Te3 multilayers prepared with MBE is investigated. A grain growth started during heating and the chemical layer structure was smeared out partly but remained in several grains and was found to be adjusted parallel to a major lattice plane in a crystallite.

    2. On the Anisotropy of Lotus-Type Porous Copper (pages 144–152)

      Thomas Fiedler, Christoph Veyhl, Irina Veniaminovna Belova, Masakazu Tane, Hideo Nakajima, Timo Bernthaler, Markus Merkel, Andreas Öchsner and Graeme Elliott Murch

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100205

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      Using numerical and analytical analysis this paper addresses the effective thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and the 0.2%-offset yield strength of lotus-type porous copper. Special consideration is given to the anisotropy of the material. In order to guarantee accurate discretization of the complex material geometry, calculation models are based here for the first time directly on microcomputed tomography data. Comparison with available experimental data is made: good agreement is found.

    3. Orientation Gradients at Boundaries in Micron-Sized Bicrystals (pages 153–161)

      Nousha Kheradmand and Horst Vehoff

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100242

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using bicrystals with single and multiple slip orientations our results obtained from EBSD measurements show that with decreasing the size of the pillars the orientation changes due to cross-slip decreases and the orientation changes at the boundary increases. This directly indicates a change in the hardening mechanism when the probability of dislocation–dislocation interaction decreases due to source-limited plasticity in the bicrystals with diameters below approximately two microns.

    4. Manufacturing of Silicon Carbide Knit Fabrics (pages 162–165)

      Christian Heiss, Nahum Travitzky and Peter Greil

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100192

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      Knit fabric textile structures are processed from silicon carbide multifilament fiber rovings. The minimum bending radius of the various single silicon carbide fibers is determined from loop tension test in order to derive boundary conditions for fiber bending in the knitting process. The processing conditions for knitting are modified in order to reduce buckling and friction acting on the silicon carbide fiber rovings. The knitted fiber preform offers a superior flexibility, wider range of pore size, and a higher degree of drapability.

    5. Aligned Single-Crystalline β-Si3N4 Whiskers Prepared with SHS Process (pages 166–169)

      Min Xia, Changchun Ge and Hongyan Guo

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100214

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      Aligned single-crystalline β-Si3N4 whiskers with high aspect ratio were first prepared via a Self-propagating high temperature-synthesis (SHS) process, by using tungsten powders as catalysts. The as-synthesized Si3N4 whiskers typically have uniform diameters of 400 nm, length about 200 µm, and exhibit smooth and straight surfaces. Above all, the products possesses a perfect aligned structure, which is quite different from the reported β-Si3N4 whiskers.

    6. Y3−xErxAl5O12 Aluminate Ceramics: Preparation, Thermal Properties and Theoretical Model of Thermal Conductivity (pages 170–177)

      Yan-Gai Liu, Peng Peng, Minghao Fang and Zhaohui Huang

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100122

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      The larger atomic weight of introduced substitutional atoms (Er) and additional phonon-scattering effects contribute to the lower values of the Young's modulus, thermal-expansion coefficient and thermal conductivity of rare-earth aluminate Y3−xErxAl5O12 ceramics. In addition, a theoretical model describing the influence of point defects on the thermal conductivity is developed on the basis of elastic-continuum theory.

    7. Development of High Performance Single-Phase Solid Solution Magnesium Alloy at Low Temperature (pages 178–184)

      Qiuming Peng, Yuanding Huang, Karl Ulrich Kainer and Norbert Hort

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100176

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      As-cast Mg-RE based single solid solution alloy has grain size of 55 µm. The elongation is higher than 30% at room temperature. The alloy exhibits obviously ductile characterization on the fracture surface, which can be regarded as a new high performance deformed materials or biomaterials.

    8. Influence of Pressing Temperature on Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Behavior of Ultrafine-Grained Cu Processed by Equal-Channel Angular Pressing (pages 185–194)

      Haiming Wen, Yonghao Zhao, Troy D. Topping, Dustin Ashford, Roberto B. Figueiredo, Cheng Xu, Terence G. Langdon and Enrique J. Lavernia

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100080

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      ECAP of Cu is carried out at five different temperatures from RT to 523 K. The results show that as the ECAP temperature is increased, yield strength decreases whereas ductility increases. From RT to 473 K, the mechanism governing microstructural refinement is continuous dynamic recrystallization; whereas at 523 K the mechanism changes to discontinuous dynamic recrystallization. The sample processed at 523 K possesses a good combination of strength and ductility.

    9. Cu[BOND]Zr[BOND]Al[BOND]Ti Bulk Metallic Glass with Enhanced Glass-Forming Ability, Mechanical Properties, Corrosion Resistance and Biocompatibility (pages 195–199)

      Lian-Yi Chen, Zheng Xue, Zheng-Jian Xu, Jia-Qi Chen, Rong-Xin He, Xi-Peng Nie, Qing-Ping Cao, Xiao-Dong Wang, Shao-Qing Ding and Jian-Zhong Jiang

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100113

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      The simultaneous enhancement of glass forming ability, plasticity, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility of CuZrAl alloy is achieved by minor alloying addition. The obtained amorphous Cu45Zr46.5Al7Ti1.5 alloy shows critical diameter of up to 1 cm, enhanced plastic strain of up to 10%, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The combination of these merits makes this alloy a promising material for structural and biomedical applications.

    10. Bioactive Materials for Regenerative Medicine: Zeolite-Hydroxyapatite Bone Mimetic Coatings (pages 200–206)

      Rajwant Singh Bedi, Gabriel Chow, Junlan Wang, Laura Zanello and Yushan S. Yan

      Version of Record online: 21 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100170

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The schematic shows a superhydrophilic zeolite-hydroxyapatite coating which outperforms the state-of-the-art Ti6Al4V alloys in corrosion resistance tests in saline and highly complex biological media. Better osteoconductive and osteoconductive properties along with elimination of the modulus mismatch between bone and the implant surface suggest enhanced osteointegration of implants and a faster post-surgical recovery for patients. Substituting titanium with zeolite-hydroxyapatite coated steels can significantly reduce the cost of implants.

  6. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Editorial
    8. Invited Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    1. Euro BioMat 2011 (page B3)

      Klaus D. Jandt

      Version of Record online: 5 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201180201

  7. Invited Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Editorial
    8. Invited Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    1. Bio-Sintering/Bio-Fusion of Silica in Sponge Spicules (pages B4–B12)

      Xiaohong Wang, Matthias Wiens, Ute Schloßmacher, Klaus Peter Jochum, Heinz C. Schröder and Werner E. G. Müller

      Version of Record online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201180059

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      Small oxyasters from the sponge Geodia cydonium (30 µm), formed from bio-silica, comprise on their surface intricate geometric ornamental design. Their morphology is genetically controlled. The sponge skeletons are formed by primary and secondary biosilicifcation that involve bio-sintering and bio-fusion processes, occurring both in demosponges and in hexactinellides.

  8. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Editorial
    8. Invited Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    1. Electrostatic Spray Deposition of Biomimetic Nanocrystalline Apatite Coatings onto Titanium (pages B13–B20)

      Michele Iafisco, Ruggero Bosco, Sander C. G. Leeuwenburgh, Jeroen J. J. P. van den Beucken, John A. Jansen, Maria Prat and Norberto Roveri

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201180062

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      The applicability of the electrostatic spray deposition technique to coat at room temperature cp-Ti substrates with poorly crystalline plate-like nanostructured carbonate-apatite was investigated. The effects of the variations of different instrumental parameters on apatite morphological appearance were analysed. Porous films made of agglomerates of nanocrystals, measuring about 50 nm with morphology and dimensions resembling that of the bone apatite mineral were obtained.

    2. Bioactive TiOB-Coating on Titanium Alloy Implants Enhances Osseointegration in a Rat Model (pages B21–B27)

      Christian Schrader, Jürgen Schmidt, Michael Diefenbeck, Thomas Mückley, Sergiy Zankovych, Jörg Bossert, Klaus D. Jandt, Mathilde Faucon and Ulrich Finger

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201180032

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      Electrochemical conversion of titanium alloy implants enhances the ceramic characteristics of the interface between bulk material and bone. These coatings are also enriched with calcium and phosphorous due to temporary thermal arc discharges which also leave a porous microstructure behind. This TiOB® interface is now approved to fulfil bioactive requirements in an animal model.

    3. Research on the Biocompatibility of the New Magnesium Alloy LANd442—An In Vivo Study in the Rabbit Tibia over 26 Weeks (pages B28–B37)

      Carolin Hampp, Berit Ullmann, Janin Reifenrath, Nina Angrisani, Dina Dziuba, Dirk Bormann, Jan-Marten Seitz and Andrea Meyer-Lindenberg

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201180066

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      This study deals with the biocompatibility of the new degradable magnesium alloy LANd442. Extruded cylindrical pins are implanted in the medullary cavity of rabbit's tibiae. Clinical investigations, X-ray, and µ-computer tomography evaluations are performed in vivo. Furthermore, after euthanasia histological investigations are done to determine the mineral apposition rate as well as bone remodeling properties and the bone implant contact.

    4. Initial Attatchment of rMSC and MG-63 Cells on Patterned Bioglass® Substrates (pages B38–B44)

      Rainer Detsch, Olivier Guillon, Lothar Wondraczek and Aldo R. Boccaccini

      Version of Record online: 19 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201180068

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      Soft lithography technique based on micromolding can be applied to introduce well-defined micropatterns on the surface of sintered bioactive glass substrates. Investigations with osteoblast-like cells and mesenchymal stem cells indicate that surface microstructuring can affect cytocompatibility and enable the assessment of the effects that different topographies have on different cell types.

    5. Drug-Coated Angioplasty Balloon Catheters: Coating Compositions and Methods (pages B45–B50)

      Madeleine Caroline Berg, Herbert Kolodziej, Bodo Cremers, Gary Gershony and Ulrich Speck

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201180067

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      Paclitaxel-coated balloon catheters for local treatment of arterial stenosis have become increasingly important in recent years. This paper informs about the development of coating formulations for angiography balloons, variables influencing their properties, and the challenges that have to be overcome on the way to an effective balloon coating.

  9. Rapid Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Editorial
    8. Invited Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    1. Influence of Silicification on the Structural and Biological Properties of Buffer-Mediated Collagen Hydrogels (pages B51–B55)

      Sandrine Quignard, Guillermo J. Copello, Carole Aimé, Isabelle Bataille, Christophe Hélary, Martin F. Desimone and Thibaud Coradin

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201180063

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      Modification of collagen gelation procedure allows the formation of silicified hydrogels at high bioorganic-inorganic content whose structure, mechanical properties and ability to promote adhesion and proliferation of primary adult human dermal fibroblasts depend on the nature, size, and charge of silica precursors.

  10. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Editorial
    8. Invited Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    1. AFM Characterization of Elastically Micropatterned Surfaces Fabricated by Fill-Molding In Capillaries (FIMIC) and Investigation of the Topographical Influence on Cell Adhesion to the Patterns (pages B56–B66)

      Susan Kelleher, Aniek Jongerius, Axel Loebus, Christine Strehmel, Zhenfang Zhang and Marga C. Lensen

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201180087

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      We employ two poly(ethylene glycol)-based polymers in our surface patterning method, FIMIC (FIll-Molding In Capillaries). Imaging of the resulting surfaces by atomic force microscopy reveals topographic differences that are, due to differential swelling of the two polymer components, either amplified or leveled out. Cell adhesion seems to be aided by this topography.

    2. Interactions of Fibroblasts with Different Morphologies Made of an Engineered Spider Silk Protein (pages B67–B75)

      Aldo Leal-Egaña, Gregor Lang, Carolin Mauerer, Jasmin Wickinghoff, Michael Weber, Stefan Geimer and Thomas Scheibel

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201180072

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      Electro-spun non-woven scaffolds made of eADF4(C16) enabled both adhesion and proliferation of fibroblasts. In contrast, at flat (film) or microstructured surfaces (hydrogels) such cell interactions were precluded. Controlled processing of recombinant spider silk proteins leads to different morphologies such as fibers, films, hydrogels, beads or non-woven mats. Here, we compared non-woven mats, films and hydrogels concerning their interaction with cells.

    3. In Vitro “Wound” Healing: Experimentally Based Phenomenological Modeling (pages B76–B88)

      Fred J. Vermolen, Amit Gefen and John W. C. Dunlop

      Version of Record online: 22 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201180080

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      We discuss several models to simulate the closure of an in vitro wound on a substrate. The formalisms involve a cell-colony model with individual cells, an upscaled model with a cell density, and a phenomenological model where the “wound” edge is tracked by determination of the curvature. The computations give the time-evolution of the “wound” area.

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