Advanced Engineering Materials

Cover image for Vol. 14 Issue 7

July 2012

Volume 14, Issue 7

Pages 423–507

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    1. Front Cover Advanced Engineering Materials 7/2012

      Zhi Huang, Yuxuan Lu, Hanshi Qin, Bing Yang and Xuejiao Hu

      Article first published online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201290026

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Cover shows drop-wise condensation taking place on a produced copper surface: spherical droplets form on the hydrophobic side (the upper part of the picture), and droplets gradually spread out to a wavy film when moving to the hydrophilic side (The lower part of the picture). The wettability gradient can improve the rate of condensation up to 30% when the gradient is synergetic with gravity. Further details can be found in the article by X. J. Hu et. al. on page 491.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    1. Adv. Eng. Mater. 7/2012

      Article first published online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201290027

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    1. Adv. Eng. Mater. 7/2012 (pages 423–426)

      Article first published online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201290025

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    1. Effect of Processing on Microstructure and Physical Properties of Three Nickel-Based Superalloys with Different Hardening Mechanisms (pages 427–438)

      Annika Strondl, Srdjan Milenkovic, André Schneider, Uta Klement and Georg Frommeyer

      Article first published online: 30 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100349

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The nickel-based superalloys Inconel alloy 600, Udimet alloy 720, and Inconel alloy 718 are produced by electron beam melting (EBM), casting, and directional solidification. Material differences due to the different processing routes are investigated. EBM seems to be a feasible way to produce superalloys with well-defined texture, no macrosegregation and a rapidly solidified microstructure.

    2. Effect of Temperature on the Dynamic Mechanical Behaviors of Zr-Based Metallic Glass Reinforced Porous Tungsten Matrix Composite (pages 439–444)

      Chen Chen, Yunfei Xue, Lu Wang, Xingwang Cheng, Fuchi Wang, Zhengbin Wang, Haifeng Zhang and Aiming Wang

      Article first published online: 18 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201100352

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Compared to the specimens subjected to 223 and 297 K, the Zr-based metallic glass reinforced porous tungsten matrix composite exhibited the best ductility and the lowest flow stress at 473 K performed on a SHPB, which were attributed to that more micro cracks were initiated in tungsten phase as well as more micro shear bands were induced in metallic glass phase with increasing temperature.

    3. In Situ Synchrotron Study of B19 Phase Formation in an Intermetallic γ-TiAl Alloy (pages 445–448)

      Thomas Schmoelzer, Andreas Stark, Emanuel Schwaighofer, Thomas Lippmann, Svea Mayer and Helmut Clemens

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200047

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In situ high-energy X-ray diffraction experiments were conducted on a heat-treated and quenched Ti–45 Al–3 Mo alloy. As shown in the image, B19 phase was formed as a transitional phase during the α2[RIGHTWARDS ARROW] γ phase transformation upon heating. In this work, the temperatures of B19 formation and dissolution are given and the structural similarities which facilitate the transformation via a transitional phase are elaborated.

    4. Linking Crack Tip Morphology to Tear Toughness of Hot Rolled AA7050 Alloys Using X-Ray Computed Tomography (pages 449–456)

      Xiaomin Wu, Erik Schlangen and Sybrand van der Zwaag

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200079

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Crack tip morphology of tear-tested AA7050 aluminium alloy has been analyzed using a lab-scale µ-CT scanner. The shape of the crack tip, bridging ligaments through the crack and the crack tunneling are demonstrated. The crack tip opening angle of the crack can be directly measured and linearly related to the tear toughness of the sample. Further analysis indicates a strong link between grain boundary serration and the fracture toughness.

    5. Linking Porosity to Rolling Reduction and Fatigue Lifetime of Hot Rolled AA7xxx Alloys by 3D X-Ray Computed Tomography (pages 457–463)

      Xiaomin Wu, Erik Schlangen and Sybrand van der Zwaag

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200087

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The porosity of hot rolled AA7xxx alloy has been imaged and analyzed using an X-ray micro-CT scanner and Avizo software. The result shows clear retained casting pores in some of the samples. With improved casting condition and modification on rolling procedures the number density and size of the pores can be effectively reduced. It is also found that by reducing the large pore size down to 10 µm will lead to greatly improved fatigue life times.

    6. On the Correlation Between Thermal Cycle and Formation of Intermetallic Phases at the Interface of Laser-Welded Aluminum-Steel Overlap Joints (pages 464–472)

      Agnieszka Szczepaniak, Jianfeng Fan, Aleksander Kostka and Dierk Raabe

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200075

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A laser beam welding via heat conduction was applied to join DC01 steel with aluminum (Al). The effect of the applied laser power (1.7, 1.8, 2.1, and 2.4 kW) on the formation and evolution of the interfaces between steel and Al was analyzed in the light of simulated thermal cycles of the joints. The microstructures of both parent materials and steel/Al interfaces were investigated using scanning electron microscope equipped with EBSD system.

    7. Determination of Minimum Machining Depth After Heat Treatment of ASTM Grade 2 Titanium Alloy (pages 473–476)

      Richard G. Dobeson, Stuart D. McDonald and Matthew S. Dargusch

      Article first published online: 20 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200106

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reports on the findings and outcomes of a study into the brittle alpha-casing which develops when titanium alloys are exposed to elevated temperatures. A nomogram has been developed and presented as a tool for determining the minimum amount of material that needs to be removed.

    8. Production of High Purity Magnesium Alloys by Melt Purification with Zr (pages 477–490)

      Arvind Prasad, Peter J. Uggowitzer, Zhiming Shi and Andrej Atrens

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200054

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Zr can remove Fe from molten Mg alloys to any desired Fe content down to 1 ppm by appropriate melt treatment. Purification occurs by the precipitation from the melt of Fe rich precipitates, and the settling of the precipitates to the bottom of the melt.

    9. Rapid Synthesis of Wettability Gradient on Copper for Improved Drop-Wise Condensation (pages 491–496)

      Zhi Huang, Yuxuan Lu, Hanshi Qin, Bing Yang and Xuejiao Hu

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200094

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple technique of making wettability gradients on copper is presented using temperature controlled surface oxidation by placing the copper sample between hot (flame) and cold (water bath) reservoirs with the presence of oxygen (air). The produced copper sample with water contact angles changing from 88 to 18° in 33 mm can enhance water condensation rate up to 30%.

    10. Extension of Ashby's Performance Indexes in Mixed Tension-Bending Solicitations (pages 497–498)

      Olivier Bouaziz and Jean-Philippe Masse

      Article first published online: 26 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200050

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ashby's performance indexes are a fundamental tool for material selection especially for structures lightening. Unfortunately the indexes are available only for simple mechanical solicitation as pure bending or pure tension. For real applications, it is required to have a performance index for combined solicitations. This publication proposes an approach to develop this kind of extended performance index and shows the exploitation in order to compare materials performance in more realistic situations.▪Author: Please shorten TOC text to 400 characters maximum.

    11. Thermomechanical Behavior of Bulk Ni/MWNT Composites Produced via Powder Metallurgy (pages 499–502)

      Sebastián Suárez, Flavio Soldera, Carlos González Oliver, Diego Acevedo and Frank Mücklich

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200100

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The bulk thermal expansion coefficient of Ni matrix composites reinforced with 1wt% MWNT was determined by differential dilatometry. A significant decrease in the CTE was observed, reaching values around 75% lower than that of pure Ni. This reduction of the CTE is directly related to the anchorage given by the MWNTs to the matrix preventing larger thermal expansions, positioning these composites as potential candidates where structural stability is required.

    12. Hierarchical Polymer Microlattice Structures (pages 503–507)

      Robert E. Doty, Joanna A. Kolodziejska and Alan J. Jacobsen

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200007

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two three-dimensional lattice structures, whose defining features (strut diameter and pore size) differ by roughly an order of magnitude, are combined through a rapid optical lithography process. The resulting hierarchical microlattice demonstrates higher specific compressive strength and energy absorption than either of its constituent lattice structures.

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