Advanced Engineering Materials

Cover image for Vol. 15 Issue 5

May 2013

Volume 15, Issue 5

Pages 313–413

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Front Cover Advanced Engineering Materials 5/2013 (page 313)

      Biao Chen, Tielin Shi, Mo Li, Zhaobo Zhang, Zhijing Zhu and Guanglan Liao

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201370011

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover shows Laser welding of Zr41Ti14Cu12Ni10Be23 bulk metallic glass and temperature field simulation. For further details see the article by Guanglan Liao et al. on page 407.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Adv. Eng. Mater. 4/2013 (page 314)

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201370012

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Adv. Eng. Mater. 5/2013 (pages 315–319)

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201370013

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    1. Measurement of an Iso-Curie Temperature Line of a Co[BOND]Cr[BOND]Mo Solid Solution by Magnetic Force Microscopy Imaging on a Diffusion Multiple (pages 321–324)

      Ji-Cheng Zhao, Yunhui Xu and Uwe Hartmann

      Version of Record online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200229

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel method is developed for effective measurement of Curie temperature as a function of composition by performing magnetic force microscopy imaging on solid solution composition gradients created in a diffusion multiple. Such a measurement is more efficient than one-alloy-at-a-time tests and can be used to screen new ferromagnetic materials. The results of the CoCr, CoMo, and CoCrMo systems are presented as a demonstration of this method.

    2. SERS Active Surface in Two Steps, Patterning and Metallization (pages 325–329)

      Diego Acevedo, Horacio Salavagione, Andrés Lasagni, Emilia Morallón, Frank Mücklich and César Barbero

      Version of Record online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200240

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly reproducible metallized nano/microstructured polymeric surfaces have been successfully prepared by direct laser interference patterning followed by sputtering of metallic films. The SERS spectra show that a ca. three order of magnitude enhancement can be achieved. The method here reported is suitable for mass production of substrates for SERS since large areas (several cm2) can be structured in short times (≈1–5 s).

    3. Microstructure and Nanoindentation Properties of Surface Textures Obtained by Laser Machining and Molding in Silicon Carbide (pages 330–335)

      Francesco Valentini, Italo Zambotto, Diletta Sciti, Laura Silvestroni, Cesare Melandri and Stefano Guicciardi

      Version of Record online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200214

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A surface texture consisting of a regular array of holes in SiC components is obtained by either conventional molding in the green state or post sintering laser machining. Very regular holes are obtained by laser machining with minimal microstructural damage. Nanoindentation tests are performed in the areas close to the holes and no significant alteration of the mechanical properties is found after laser machining.

    4. Architecturing of Metal-Based Composites with Concurrent Nanostructuring: A New Paradigm of Materials Design (pages 336–340)

      Olivier Bouaziz, Hyong Seop Kim and Yuri Estrin

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200261

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Severe plastic deformation (SPD) techniques are one of the most potent ways of producing bulk nanostrucred materials. The main advantage of SPD is the ultra-high strength but there is a limit to what is achievable when they are applied to individual materials especially ductility. Therefore a new application of SPD processes as torsion–extrusion in manufacturing of architectured hybrid materials with simultaneous nanostructuring is presented.

    5. Wetting Properties of Steel Surfaces Modified by Laser Interference Metallurgy (pages 341–346)

      Brice Raillard, Justine Rémond, Esteban Ramos-Moore, Nicolas Souza, Carsten Gachot and Frank Mücklich

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200247

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Different patterns are created at the surface of 100Cr6 bearing steel by means of laser interference structuring. Contact angle measurements are performed in static and dynamic modes using FVA2 industrial oil and distilled water. The pattern orientation, homogeneity, and periodicity have a strong influence on the wetting behavior.

    6. Variability of Poisson's Ratio and Enhanced Ductility in Amorphous Metal (pages 347–351)

      Klaus-Dieter Liss, Dongdong Qu, Kun Yan and Mark Reid

      Version of Record online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200216

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      X-ray diffraction rings from bulk metallic glass represent the elastic strain ellipse along azimuth ψ upon uniaxial, mechanic compression. Poisson's ratio, defined by the quotient of strain in the longitudinal L and transverse T direction, varies upon the onset of plastic flow and is found to become ultimately large just before failure. The in situ experiment finds strain saturation at atomic close packing in the L direction while atoms yield laterally, creating free volume. The non-affine behavior of elastic-plastic deformation gives an explanation for the correlation between high Poisson's ratio and high ductility of metallic glass.

    7. Low Temperature Plasticity of Ultrafine-Grained AE42 and AZ31 Magnesium Alloys (pages 352–357)

      Sergii Eduardovich Shumilin, Milos Janecek, Nikolai Vasilievich Isaev, Peter Minarik and Robert Kral

      Version of Record online: 17 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200324

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Plastic deformation of AZ31 and AE42 alloys processed by ECAP is investigated in temperature range from 0.5 to 293 K. At the temperatures 4.2 K and lower, the stress–strain curves become serrated. The slope of the temperature dependencies of the yield stress is typical for the thermally activated interaction of dislocations with a spectrum of local obstacles.

    8. Comparative Analysis of Fracture Strength of Slurry and Diamond Wire Sawn Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Wafers (pages 358–365)

      Chris Yang, Hao Wu, Shreyes Melkote and Steven Danyluk

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200262

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fracture strength of mc-Si solar wafers and its spatial distribution within a wafer were studied. The slurry sawn wafers exhibit a gradual increase in fracture strength from wire entry to wire exit while the diamond sawn wafers show an anisotropic strength behavior relative to the bending orientation. The strength variation is attributed to surface and sub-surface defects from sawing processes.

    9. A Novel Microwave-Assisted Carbothermic Route for the Production of Copper-Carbon Nanotube Metal Matrix Composites Directly from Copper Oxide (pages 366–372)

      Danny Vennerberg, Rafael Quirino and Michael R. Kessler

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200250

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new method of producing multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) directly from metal oxides is developed in this study. Using Cu2O as a test case, Cu-MWCNT composites with high hardness and MWCNT loading are obtained by microwave irradiation of a mixture of carbon nanotubes and metal oxide in an inert atmosphere. This approach provides a promising and versatile route for the fabrication of MWCNT reinforced MMCs.

    10. Grain Refinement of Magnesium Alloys by Mg–Zr Master Alloys: The Role of Alloy Chemistry and Zr Particle Number Density (pages 373–378)

      Ming Sun, Mark A. Easton, David H. StJohn, Guohua Wu, Trevor B. Abbott and Wenjiang Ding

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200297

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The grain size of Zr-refined Mg alloys is controlled by two factors: the size of the nucleation-free zone, xnfz, where once a nucleation event occurs no further nucleation is possible within this zone; and the Zr particle number density of particle sizes between 1 and 5 µm. The particle number density increases with Zr addition as does the Q-value, which in turn reduces the value of xnfz and the average distance between potent Zr particles, xSd. The Interdependence equation has been modified to predict xSd.

    11. Thermoelectric Properties of Nanocrystalline Silicon from a Scaled-Up Synthesis Plant (pages 379–385)

      Victor Kessler, Devendraprakash Gautam, Tim Hülser, Mathias Spree, Ralf Theissmann, Markus Winterer, Hartmut Wiggers, Gabi Schierning and Roland Schmechel

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200233

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The properties of thermoelectrics made from boron doped silicon nanoparticles are presented. The particles were produced in a scaled-up synthesis plant and compacted by direct current assisted sintering. The influence of the sintering temperature on the thermoelectric properties was investigated systematically. A figure-of-merit value of about 0.32 at 700 °C was measured for the optimized p-type nanosilicon.

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Thermoelectric Properties of Nanocrystalline Silicon from a Scaled-Up Synthesis Plant

      Vol. 15, Issue 11, 1152, Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2013

    12. Multiple Memory Shape Memory Alloys (pages 386–393)

      Mohammad Ibraheem Khan, Andrew Pequegnat and Y. Norman Zhou

      Version of Record online: 15 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200246

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This work describes a controlled constituent vaporization protocol for local augmentation of shape memory alloy transformation temperatures. Proof of concept was demonstrated by embedding multiple shape memories into a monolithic NiTi component. This novel technique overcomes traditional fabrication challenges and promises to enhance functionality through producing a new class of smart materials.

    13. Bulk Ceramic Composites Derived from a Preceramic Polysilazane with Alumina and Zirconia Fillers (pages 394–406)

      Thomas Konegger, Antje Liersch, Christian Gierl and Michael Scheffler

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200134

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Novel ceramic composites derived from poly(vinyl)silazane with Al2O3 or ZrO2 fillers are investigated to introduce green-machinable, complex-shaped ceramics with tailorable properties. The main factors influencing the structural and mechanical properties of the materials are identified, including the composite powder production step, the warm-pressing of the powders, as well as the temperature of pyrolytic conversion.

    14. Laser Welding of Zr41Ti14Cu12Ni10Be23 Bulk Metallic Glass: Experiment and Temperature Field Simulation (pages 407–413)

      Biao Chen, Tielin Shi, Mo Li, Zhaobo Zhang, Zhijing Zhu and Guanglan Liao

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201200308

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Zr41Ti14Cu12Ni10Be23 bulk metallic glass (BMG) is welded using laser bonding. To overcome the limitation in probing the temperature field and optimize the welding parameters of BMG bonding, the finite element method is used to simulate temperature field and calculate thermal cycle. The dynamic temperature contours and the thermal cycle curves describe the thermal interaction during laser welding.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION