Advanced Engineering Materials

Cover image for Vol. 16 Issue 6

Special Issue: Advanced Ceramics and Coating Processing

June 2014

Volume 16, Issue 6

Pages 597–819

Issue edited by: Nahum Travitzky, Eugene Medvedovski

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Reviews
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Front Cover: Advanced Engineering Materials 6∕2014 (page 597)

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201470020

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The front cover refers to the AEM Special Issue on “Achievements in Advanced Ceramics and Coating Processing”: SiSiC functionally graded macro-cellular structures and downscaled turbine wheel fabricated by 3D Printing and selective laser curing (SLC), respectively, as described by Nahum Travitzky and co-workers on page 605.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Reviews
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. Inside Front Cover: Advanced Engineering Materials 6∕2014 (page 598)

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201470021

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The inside cover design presents the processing route of non-oxide ceramic fibers from inorganic polymers. In the first stage the inorganic polymer is synthesized in a reactor. After meltspinning process the polymeric fibers are cross-linked to render the fibers infusible and subsequently pyrolysed under inert atmosphere in the oven at temperatures ≥1100°C. More details can be found in the article by Octavio Flores and co-workers on page 621.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Reviews
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. Back Cover: Advanced Engineering Materials 6∕2014 (page 822)

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201470024

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The image illustrates the conversion of a cellulosic structure to a ceramic material at the example of a wood cell wall and a silica replica thereof. After deposition and condensation of the tetrahedral silica precursor within the voids of the fibrillar template, the latter is thermally removed to yield a monolithic biotemplated ceramic structure with retained structural details on the nanometer scale. For more details please find the article by Cordt Zollfrank and co-workers on page 699.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Reviews
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: Adv. Eng. Mater. 6∕2014 (page 821)

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201470023

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Reviews
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. Contents: Adv. Eng. Mater. 6∕2014 (pages 599–604)

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201470022

  6. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Reviews
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. Achievements in Advanced Ceramics and Coating Processing (pages 605–606)

      Eugene Medvedovski and Nahum Travitzky

      Article first published online: 7 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400130

  7. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Reviews
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. Macroporous Ceramics by Gelation–Freezing Route Using Gelatin (pages 607–620)

      Manabu Fukushima, Yu-ichi Yoshizawa and Tatsuki Ohji

      Article first published online: 31 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400067

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper reviews a gelation–freezing method to create nearly honeycomb shaped pore channels and the engineering applications of obtained macrocellular monoliths. Depending on freezing conditions carefully selected, cell size, wall thickness, number of cells, and cell interconnection can be modulated. Fabrication methods proposed are simple, economical, and versatile to produce macroporous ceramic monoliths.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Ceramic Fibers Based on SiC and SiCN Systems: Current Research, Development, and Commercial Status (pages 621–636)

      Octavio Flores, Rajendra K. Bordia, Daisy Nestler, Walter Krenkel and Günter Motz

      Article first published online: 31 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400069

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Non-oxide ceramic fibers are key components for the reinforcement of lightweight thermostructural materials. This paper reviews the evolution of processing, microstructure and physical properties of commercially available CVD SiC fibers and three generations of polymers derived ceramic (PDC) SiC fibers over the past fifty years. Additionally discussion is focused on the recent advances in research and development related to ceramic fibers from SiC and SiCN systems.

    3. Shaping of Dense Advanced Ceramics and Coatings by Gelation of Polysaccharides (pages 637–654)

      María Isabel Nieto, Isabel Santacruz and Rodrigo Moreno

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400076

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Illustration of the gel-dipping process, showing the variation of viscosity on cooling of Al2O3–ZrO2 suspensions prepared to a solids loading of 30 wt% and a relative ratio of 95/5 v/v, respectively using carrageenan (0.8 wt% referred to the solids loading), and the microstructure of the obtained coating sintered at 1550 °C/2 h.

    4. Processing and Characterization of Aluminum Nitride Ceramics for High Thermal Conductivity (pages 655–669)

      Hyun Min Lee, Kamala Bharathi and Do Kyung Kim

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400078

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The effects of sintering additives, microstructure, and morphology of second phase on the thermal conductivity of aluminum nitride ceramics (AlN) are discussed. The morphology of second phase in AlN ceramics could be controlled by changing the cooling rate. With the CaF2 addition, the formation of second phase can be suppressed and high thermal conductivity is achieved.

    5. Microstructure and Properties of Carbon Fiber Reinforced SiC Matrix Composites Containing Ti3SiC2 (pages 670–683)

      Xiaomeng Fan and Xiaowei Yin

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400081

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The tribological behavior of C/C-SiC and ablation resistance of C/SiC are improved by introducing Ti3SiC2, revealing that the introduction of MAX phases into ceramic matrix composites is an effective way to improve their performance and extend their application fields.

    6. Biopolymer-Based Gel Casting of Ferroelectric Ceramics (pages 684–698)

      Kevin P. Plucknett and Cameron D. Munro

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400084

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Aqueous gel casting of ferroelectric ceramics is investigated, using agar as a gelling aid. Combining high-solids content BaTiO3 suspensions (55 vol%), with concentrated agar solutions (up to 8 wt%), allows casting of components with high green densities (and final agar concentrations up to 1 wt% of the solids loading), which can be subsequently green-machined. Fine scale features (≈300 μm thick), with high aspect ratios (up to 13:1), are successfully fabricated.

    7. You have free access to this content
      Cellulose-Based Biotemplated Silica Structuring (pages 699–712)

      Daniel Van Opdenbosch and Cordt Zollfrank

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400085

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Advances in the field of ceramic biotemplating based on cellulose templates are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to templating of silica on the nanometer scale. Principles that are employed by nature can be adapted by man to yield hitherto unattainable detailed and hierarchically structured materials.

    8. Wear- and Corrosion-Resistant Boride-Based Coatings Obtained through Thermal Diffusion CVD Processing (pages 713–728)

      Eugene Medvedovski, Fred A. Chinski and Jim Stewart

      Article first published online: 28 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400090

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The formation of hard iron boride wear- and corrosion-resistant protective coatings on steels and ferrous alloys through the thermal diffusion process is described. The features of the coating structure and properties are reported. The major application areas of the commercially produced coatings are presented.

    9. You have free access to this content
      Additive Manufacturing of Ceramic-Based Materials (pages 729–754)

      Nahum Travitzky, Alexander Bonet, Benjamin Dermeik, Tobias Fey, Ina Filbert-Demut, Lorenz Schlier, Tobias Schlordt and Peter Greil

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400097

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Main emphasis of this review is laid on the additive manufacturing of ceramic-based composites. Fabrication of ceramic components via three-dimensional printing, selective laser curing, three-dimensional extrusion freeforming, stereolithography, and laminated object manufacturing clearly demonstrates the high potential for materials science adaptation to additive manufacturing. The studies reviewed in this article will add the scientific base and extend the knowledge for designing and processing of novel advanced ceramic-based materials with complex geometry (see e.g.: SiSiC macrocellular functionally graded structures) and thus, will stimulate new fields of their applications.

  8. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Reviews
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. Mechanical Properties of Hot Isostatically Pressed Li0.35La0.55TiO3 (pages 755–759)

      Christopher Cooper, Anthony C. Sutorik, Jared Wright, E. Arthur Luoto III, Gary Gilde and Jeff Wolfenstine

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400071

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The mechanical properties of polycrystalline Li0.35La0.55TiO3 (LLTO) are investigated after sintering followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The elastic modulus (223 GPa), hardness (Knoop hardness 7.2 GPa), and flexure strength (252 MPa) values for HIP LLTO are in general higher than those for other solid Li-ion conductors thus, making it an excellent choice as a Li-ion conducting solid electrolyte based on mechanical properties.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Reviews
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. Pulse Electrosynthesis of MnO2 Electrodes for Supercapacitors (pages 760–766)

      Yisong Su and Igor Zhitomirsky

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400077

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      MnO2 electrodes for supercapacitors are prepared by cathodic pulse electrosynthesis, which allows impregnation of Ni plaque current collectors, designed for high power applications. The electrodes show high capacitance and high power-energy characteristics at high materials loadings.

    2. Phase Transformation in Laser-Induced Micro-Explosion in Olivine (Fe,Mg)2SiO4 (pages 767–773)

      Ričardas Buividas, Gediminas Gervinskas, Anton Tadich, Bruce C. C. Cowie, Vygantas Mizeikis, Arturas Vailionis, Dominique de Ligny, Eugene G. Gamaly, Andrei V. Rode and Saulius Juodkazis

      Article first published online: 31 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400091

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra from laser-affected olivine show that micro-explosion generated by a femtosecond pulse produces change of iron valence state. This result indicates that spatial separation between ions of different mass occurs in hot, highly excited olivine. This mechanism presents a pathway toward new nano-materials.

    3. Colloidal Processing and Yield Stress Modeling Towards Dry Pressed Green Bodies for Transparent Polycrystalline Alumina (pages 774–784)

      Michael Stuer and Paul Bowen

      Article first published online: 2 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400099

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      That Mg and Y dopants are used to control alumina microstructures is well known but they have an adverse effect on suspension rheology. The dopants interact with the dispersant polyacrylic acid (PAA) and are-co-adsorbed via complexation with the PAA. This coupled with interparticle force and rheological modeling clarifies the rheolgical behavior.

    4. Field-Assisted Powder Synthesis and Consolidation of Fe–Ti–C Metal–Ceramic Composites (pages 785–791)

      Marya S. Yurlova, Aleksander N. Novoselov, Yen-Shan Lin, Olga N. Sizonenko, Evgeny G. Grigoryev, Oleg L. Khasanov and Eugene A. Olevsky

      Article first published online: 2 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400105

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fe, Ti powders, and their mixtures are subjected to electric discharges in a hydrocarbon liquid. The obtained powder mixtures are consolidated by spark plasma sintering. The developed novel technological route uses electromagnetic field assistance at both powder synthesis and consolidation stages.

    5. Structure of Zirconium Alloy Powder Coatings Processed by High Voltage Electric Discharge Consolidation (pages 792–796)

      Evgeny G. Grigoryev, Lyuba Yu. Lebedeva, Oleg L. Khasanov and Eugene A. Olevsky

      Article first published online: 2 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400106

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Zirconium alloy powders (Zr + 1% Nb) of spherical and flake forms have been consolidated by high voltage electric discharge processing. The consolidation enabled the fabrication of coatings on ceramic and metallic substrates as well as of freestanding powder components.

    6. Low Temperature Processing of Reaction-Bonded Boron Carbide Composites (pages 797–805)

      Nachum Frage, Shmuel Hayun, Helen Dilman and Moshe P. Dariel

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400108

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel approach for fabrication of reaction bonded B4C-(Al, Mg) composites at low temperature is described. The key feature of this approach is the uses of Mg-vapor atmosphere during the infiltration process. Low temperature process allows preventingthe formation of the deleterious aluminum carbide (Al4C3).

    7. Microstructure Development and Dielectric Characterization of Forsterite-Based Ceramics from Silicone Resins and Oxide Fillers (pages 806–813)

      Enrico Bernardo, Laura Fiocco, Guinevere A. Giffin, Vito Di Noto and Paolo Colombo

      Article first published online: 9 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400125

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mixtures of silicones and nano-sized MgO easily yield forsterite ceramics starting from 800 °C. Undesirable phases are suppressed using additional oxides, such as TiO2. Nano-TiO2 promotes the formation of Ti-doped forsterite, micro-TiO2 leads to forsterite/rutile composites, both featuring interesting dielectric characteristics (low dielectric constant, high quality factor, shown in the figure), despite the residual porosity.

    8. Novel SiC/C Aerogels Through Pyrolysis of Polycarbosilane Precursors (pages 814–819)

      Emanuele Zera, Renzo Campostrini, Parakkulam Ramaswamy Aravind, Yigal Blum and Gian Domenico Sorarù

      Article first published online: 28 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400134

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new method to obtain SiC/C aerogels is proposed. Preceramic aerogels made of polycarbosilane crosslinked with divinylbenzene are obtained by means of Pt catalyzed hydrosilylation reaction in highly diluted condition. Supercritical drying is performed with liquid CO2 and after pyrolysis monolithic SiC/C aerogels are obtained.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION