Advanced Engineering Materials

Cover image for Vol. 16 Issue 7

July 2014

Volume 16, Issue 7

Pages 823–939

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Front Cover: Advanced Engineering Materials 7∕2014 (page 823)

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201470026

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The paper by Eric R. Homer and coworkers explores, as described on page 850, the use of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) in compliant mechanisms (CMs), structures which use the elastic deformation of thin members in place of pins and bearings. BMGs have among the highest elastic strain limit of any metals (2%) and can be injection molded like polymers, making them ideal CM materials. Image courtesy of D. Hofmann.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Inside Front Cover: Advanced Engineering Materials 7∕2014 (page 824)

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201470027

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Full atomistic molecular model of layered carbon/metal 2D nanocomposite, consisting of graphdiyne and copper, implemented to predict and characterize mechanical behavior using molecular dynamics simulation and validated via rule of mixture formulations, modified for modest interfacial weakening. The non-covalent composite system displays flaw tolerance and dislocation-blocking mechanisms. More details can be found in the article by Steven W. Cranford and co-workers on page 862.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Back Cover: Advanced Engineering Materials 7∕2014 (page 1042)

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201470031

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The back cover shows a graded part obtained by Selective Laser Melting. For more details see the article by Thomas Niendorf and co-workers on co-workers on page 857. The SLM machine used has lasers of 400 W and 1000 W. Employing each laser in distinct areas leads to different microstructures, as visible on macroscopic (center) and microscopic (right) scale. This affects the mechanical behavior as areas processed by the 1000 W laser show higher strains (left).

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Masthead: Adv. Eng. Mater. 7∕2014 (page 1041)

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201470030

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Field-Assisted Sintering Technology/Spark Plasma Sintering: Mechanisms, Materials, and Technology Developments (pages 830–849)

      Olivier Guillon, Jesus Gonzalez-Julian, Benjamin Dargatz, Tobias Kessel, Gabi Schierning, Jan Räthel and Mathias Herrmann

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201300409

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The processing of novel inorganic materials at the lab scale or the rapid manufacturing of industrial products with higher output and reduced energy costs can be achieved by using versatile electric field-assisted technologies. This review addresses their historical, technical, and scientific development, highlighting successes but also future research needs.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. New Methods for Developing and Manufacturing Compliant Mechanisms Utilizing Bulk Metallic Glass (pages 850–856)

      Eric R. Homer, Matthew B. Harris, Shannon A. Zirbel, Joanna A. Kolodziejska, Henry Kozachkov, Brian P. Trease, John-Paul C. Borgonia, Gregory S. Agnes, Larry L. Howell and Douglas C. Hofmann

      Version of Record online: 5 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201300566

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Compliant mechanisms rely on the elastic bending of thin members to generate motion. In the paper by Homer, et al., bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are shown to have an optimal combination of mechanical properties and processing ability, making them ideal for complex, low-cost compliant mechanisms.

    2. Functionally Graded Alloys Obtained by Additive Manufacturing (pages 857–861)

      Thomas Niendorf, Stefan Leuders, Andre Riemer, Florian Brenne, Thomas Tröster, Hans Albert Richard and Dieter Schwarze

      Version of Record online: 28 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201300579

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In the current study, selective laser melting is employed for direct manufacturing of functionally graded materials. An appropriate set of processing parameters allowing for direct microstructure manipulation of stainless steel is presented. Thorough analyses reveal a steep microstructural gradient resulting in distinct local mechanical properties. The process introduced will further give raise to the rapidly evolving field of additive manufacturing.

    3. Strength and Toughness of Graphdiyne/Copper Nanocomposites (pages 862–871)

      Ruth E. Roman and Steven W. Cranford

      Version of Record online: 3 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400160

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A slight amount of graphdiyne by weight can dramatically increase the mechanical performance of copper. Via full atomistic molecular dynamics, we characterize the mechanical properties of layered copper/graphdiyne nanocomposites. Defective copper is used to assess potential dislocation constraint.

    4. Analytical Model of the Unbending Behavior of Corrugated Reinforcements (pages 872–877)

      Mark Fraser, Hatem Zurob, Peidong Wu and Olivier Bouaziz

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201300525

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this contribution, the tensile behavior of an isolated corrugated sheet is analyzed. A simple analytical model is developed to describe the unbending of the corrugation and the stretching of the sheet as a function of the initial geometric and material parameters. The model predictions are in good agreement with experimental observations for corrugated sheets of IF steel.

    5. Micro Mirror Polymer Composite Offers Mechanically Switchable Light Transmittance (pages 878–883)

      Aline C. C. Rotzetter, Roland Fuhrer, Robert N. Grass, Christoph M. Schumacher, Philipp R. Stoessel and Wendelin J. Stark

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201300478

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Elastic silicone composites with mechanically switchable transparency are generated by incorporating micron-sized aluminum platelets into a highly flexible silicone. Physisorbing Fe3O4 nanoparticles onto the platelets surface allow magnetic pre-alignment during the polymer curing. One-dimensional or two-dimensional stretching of the resulting silicone composites permits orientation of the incorporated flakes and alters light transmittance of the polymer coating.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Rapid Formation of a Monolayer of Oriented Hard-Magnetic Strontium Hexaferrite Nanoparticles on a Solid Substrate (pages 884–888)

      Sergey E. Kushnir, Dmitry S. Koshkodaev, Pavel E. Kazin, Dmitry M. Zuev, Dmitry D. Zaytsev and Martin Jansen

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201300448

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Monolayers of oriented platelet strontium hexaferrite nanoparticles form readily on a glass surface while immersing the substrate in the charge stabilized colloidal solution of the particles. The films show almost rectangular magnetization hysteresis loops typical for strongly textured hard-magnetic materials.

    2. Fabrication and Deformation of Metallic Glass Micro-Lattices (pages 889–896)

      Jan Rys, Lorenzo Valdevit, Tobias A. Schaedler, Alan J. Jacobsen, William B. Carter and Julia R. Greer

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201300454

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This work presents the fabrication, characterization and properties of hollow metallic glass nickel-phosphorous microlattices. We discovered that at wall thicknesses below ≈150nm the mechanical properties can no longer be calculated by classical models, with strengths nearly an order of magnitude higher than predicted. This is caused by a shift in deformation mechanism from post-elastic catastrophic failure in thick-walled structures to localized plastic deformability, which emerges as a result of brittle-to-ductile transition in nano-sized metallic glasses. These findings suggest a viable and economic route to design and fabricate high-strength, lightweight structural materials by combining structural effects with material size effects.

    3. Effect of Defects Induced by 12C+ Ion Irradiation on the Fluorination of Pyrolytic Carbon Coating in Flinak Salt (pages 897–904)

      Shanglei Feng, Li Li, Xinmei Yang, Xingtai Zhou, Shuo Bai and Tsun Kong Sham

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201300479

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coating is used as a candidate protector of unclear graphite to against the impregnation of molten Flinak salt in molten salt reactor. This study primarily investigates the effect of defects induced by 12C+ ion irradiation on the fluorination of PyC coating in Flinak salt. Results show evidence for the formation of C[BOND]F bond, and the defects facilitate the fluorination of PyC coating in Flinak salt.

    4. Sustained Percolation in Stretched Silver Nanowire Networks for Stretchable Inter-Connection Applications (pages 905–908)

      Jae Sung Park, Mohamad Rezaei and Woo Soo Kim

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201300483

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Synergized effects of stress-relieved horseshoe pattern and flexibility of silver nanowire (AgNW) network enable the printed circuit board (PCB) to have sustained percolation in stretched AgNW network. A stretchable PCB inter-connection is allowed by highly flexible AgNW electrode on polydopamine-treated silicone rubber substrate. And optimized meander structure keeps AgNW's percolation for maintaining high conductivity during stretching demonstration.

    5. Aluminum–Iodoform Composite Reactive Material (pages 909–917)

      Ani Abraham, Shasha Zhang, Yasmine Aly, Mirko Schoenitz and Edward L. Dreizin

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201300400

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Al[BOND]CHI3 composites are prepared with iodine concentration of 20 wt% using cryo-milling. Iodine is released upon heating in stages with the main weight loss near the Al melting. The materials oxidize in two main steps. The ignition temperatures of the prepared materials are lower compared to similar Al · I2 composite prepared using cryo-milling.

    6. Evaluating a New Core-Sheath Procedure for Processing Hard Metals by Equal-Channel Angular Pressing (pages 918–926)

      Hamed Shahmir, Mahmoud Nili-Ahmadabadi, Mojtaba Mansouri-Arani, Ali Khajezade and Terence G. Langdon

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201300474

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new billet design is introduced, which has been used successfully to process NiTi as a hard-to-deform material by ECAP through two passes at room temperature. In this procedure, the hard-to-deform material is inserted as a core within an Fe sheath to give a core–sheath billet. The present investigation is initiated to evaluate the deformation behavior occurring within core–sheath billets of three different materials processed by ECAP. The results reveal the presence of a zone of lower strain along the lower part of the core.

    7. Martensitic Phase Transformation and Deformation Behavior of Fe–Mn–C–Al Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steel during High-Pressure Torsion (pages 927–932)

      Kun Yan, Dhriti Bhattacharyya, Qi Lian, Saurabh Kabra, Megumi Kawasaki, David G. Carr, Mark D. Callaghan, Maxim Avdeev, Huijun Li, Yanbo Wang, Xiaozhou Liao, Terence G. Langdon, Klaus-Dieter Liss and Rian J. Dippenaar

      Version of Record online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201300488

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High pressure torsion of TWIP steel shows the formation of an HCP Martensite phase, whose volume fraction first increases, then decreases with increasing strain, as shown by local synchrotron diffraction at various points along the radius of the sample, and neutron diffraction on samples with increasing number of turns. Local texture analysis shows the correlation between position and predominant deformation mechanism.

    8. Influence of Sulfur on the Recrystallization and {100}〈001〉 Cube Texture Formation in Fe48%Ni Alloys Tapes (pages 933–939)

      Yanick Ateba Betanda, Anne-Laure Helbert, François Brisset, Mickael Wehbi, Marie-Hélène Mathon, Thierry Waeckerlé and Thierry Baudin

      Version of Record online: 20 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.201300419

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The addition of sulfur in the Fe48%Ni alloys favors the formation of Cube texture. In the Fe48%Ni alloys tapes, the fraction of Cube grains {100}〈001〉 increases in the recrystallized states when the sulfur content increases (a–e). In the deformed states, the stored energy of the main cold-rolled components that are S {132}〈6–43〉, C {112}〈11–1〉, and B {110}〈1–12〉, remains quasi constant with sulfur content (f). Thus, the stored energy difference between the Cube and other orientations (ΔECube/Other) increases when sulfur is added (g). This stored energy difference is the driving force of the Cube grains formation. Therefore, the increase of ΔEOther/Cube promotes the Cube grains formation and growth during the recrystallization.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION