Advanced Engineering Materials

Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 1‐2

February, 2007

Volume 9, Issue 1-2

Pages 3–128

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Research News
    7. Communications
    8. Erratum
    9. Communications
    1. Cover Picture: 3D Characterization of Graphite Morphologies in Cast Iron (Adv. Eng. Mater. 1-2/2007)

      A. Velichko, C. Holzapfel and F. Mücklich

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200790000

      This article presents for the first time a full 3D characterization of irregular graphite morphologies in cast iron using Focused Ion Beam (FIB) tomography. It provides the new basis for understanding the different growth mechanisms and the limits of graphite classification used in common 2D strategies. Thus, the accuracy of the graphite classification could be estimated. In addition, the stereological parameters of the 3D structure can be directly obtained.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Research News
    7. Communications
    8. Erratum
    9. Communications
    1. John Wiley & Sons: 200 Years of Publishing (page 3)

      J. Ritterbusch

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200790002

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Research News
    7. Communications
    8. Erratum
    9. Communications
  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Research News
    7. Communications
    8. Erratum
    9. Communications
    1. Mechanisms for Fatigue of Micron-Scale Silicon Structural Films (pages 15–30)

      D. H. Alsem, O. N. Pierron, E. A. Stach, C. L. Muhlstein and R. O. Ritchie

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600269

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Although bulk silicon is not susceptible to fatigue, micron-scale silicon is. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this surprising behavior although the issue remains contentious. This review describes fatigue results for micron-scale thin silicon films from several different studies and concludes that a reaction-layer fatigue mechanism provides the most conclusive explanation for all the presented data and for the marked difference in fatigue behavior of bulk and micron-scale silicon.

  5. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Research News
    7. Communications
    8. Erratum
    9. Communications
    1. Measuring the Plastic Zone Size by Orientation Gradient Mapping (OGM) and Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging (ECCI) (pages 31–37)

      M. T. Welsch, M. Henning, M. Marx and H. Vehoff

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600195

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      For the local investigation of plastic deformation mechanisms non-destructive methods are needed to image the distribution of dislocations and to measure dislocation densities. Additionally these methods should be usable in situ. Therefore the well known methods EBSD and ECCI are improved by an appropriate processing of the measured data. The resulting two new techniques OGM and ECCI-plus are validated in detail for two complex sets of experiment. Both techniques are used to image plastic deformation zones and to measure the size of plastic zones on a macro scale (hardness indents) as well as on a micro scale (crack tips) as demonstrated in this paper. Additionally OGM gives even quantitative data of the degree of deformation. The capability of both methods is discussed in detail and it is shown that they are independent from the topography which is critically surveyed.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Research News
    7. Communications
    8. Erratum
    9. Communications
    1. 3D Characterization of Graphite Morphologies in Cast Iron (pages 39–45)

      A. Velichko, C. Holzapfel and F. Mücklich

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600175

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This article presents for the first time a full 3D characterization of irregular graphite morphologies in cast iron using Focused Ion Beam (FIB) tomography. It provides the new basis for understanding the different growth mechanisms and the limits of graphite classification used in common 2D strategies. Thus, the accuracy of the graphite classification could be estimated. In addition, the stereological parameters of the 3D structure can be directly obtained.

    2. Micro-Raman Analysis of the Si Particles Present in Al-Si Hypereutectic Alloys in Liquid and Semi-Solid States (pages 46–51)

      F. C. Robles Hernandez, J. H. Sokolowski and J. de J. Cruz Rivera

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600173

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A multi-disciplinary methodology using state-of-the-art characterization techniques was used in the present research to demonstrate the agglomeration of Si atoms in liquid Al-Si hypereutectic. The investigated microstructures were frozen, by rapid quenching, from liquid and semi-solid states. During solidification the Al-Si hypereutectic alloy was characterized by thermal analysis; the solid microstructure characterized by optical microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

    3. Processing, Properties and Coating of Micro-Porous Syntactic Foams (pages 52–56)

      J. Weise, V. Zanetti-Bueckmann, O. Yezerska, M. Schneider and M. Haesche

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600198

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The production of microporous syntactic foam by pressure infiltration of sintered preforms of micro glass bubbles with Al-, Zn- and Mg-alloys was examined. Compression tests with aluminium matrix specimens showed that this material has a very high compression strength and behaves almost like an ideal crash energy absorber. Due to their closed microscopic-scale porosity such foams can be surface treated e.g. by anodizing processes. The figure shows a cross section of an anodized aluminium syntactic foam.

    4. Production of Porous Materials Through Consolidation of Pickering Emulsions (pages 57–59)

      B. Neirinck, J. Fransaer, O. Van der Biest and J. Vleugels

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600191

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Free-standing porous objects were made by the electrophoretic deposition and slip casting of Pickering emulsions stabilized with alumina and titanium powder. By controlling the emulsion parameters, the pore size can be controlled from a few micrometers to a few millimeters. Both open and closed porosity were obtained by changing the emulsion composition. Since no pore forming solid template is used, the delicate and lengthy debinding step during processing is eliminated.

    5. Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Resistance of a Novel Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy (pages 60–64)

      P. Huang, R. Liu, X. J. Wu and M. X. Yao

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600160

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new Ni-23Cr-18Mo (wt.%) alloy, designated as Nistelle Super C, was developed recently at Deloro Stellite Inc. for high corrosion resistance applications. Microstructure and phase transformation behaviour of the alloy were studied using SEM and DSC techniques, respectively. Mechanical properties such as stress - strain relation of the alloy and load – depth relation of individual phases of the alloy were determined under uniaxial tension and under nano indentation, respectively. Corrosion resistance of the alloy in oxidizing and reducing acids was evaluated in accordance with ASTM standard test designation G31-72.

    6. Experimental Measurement and Computer Simulation of Galvanic Corrosion of Magnesium Coupled to Steel (pages 65–74)

      J. X. Jia, G. Song and A. Atrens

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600206

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The influence of geometrical factors on the galvanic current distribution for the magnesium alloy AZ91D coupled to steel was investigated using a Boundary Element Method (BEM) model and experimental measurements. The galvanic current distribution calculated from the BEM model was in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The study was extended to practical components by the study of the galvanic corrosion of AZ91D coupled to a steel fastener.

    7. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Evaluation of the Corrosion Behavior of Die Cast and Thixocast AXJ530 Magnesium Alloy in Chloride Solution (pages 75–83)

      S. Jin, S. Amira and E. Ghali

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600199

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The most used commercial magnesium alloy is AZ91D, but its creep resistance is low. A new Mg-Al-Ca-Sr alloy (AXJ530) has better creep resistance than AZ91. However, the corrosion resistance of die cast AXJ530 is much lower than AZ91. To improve its corrosion performance, the alloy is thixocast from billets previously cast with electromagnetic stirring. This thixocast AXJ530 has comparable corrosion property to AZ91 in 0.05 M NaCl solution.

  7. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Research News
    7. Communications
    8. Erratum
    9. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Laser Processing of Advanced Bioceramics (page 83)

      R. J. Narayan, C. Jin, A. Doraiswamy, I. N. Mihailescu, M. Jelinek, A. Ovsianikov, B. Chichkov and D. B. Chrisey

      Version of Record online: 22 MAR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200790006

      This article corrects:

      Laser Processing of Advanced Bioceramics1

      Vol. 7, Issue 12, 1083–1098, Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2006

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Research News
    7. Communications
    8. Erratum
    9. Communications
    1. Multiwall Carbon Nanotube-SiO2 Nanocomposites: Sintering, Elastic Properties, and Fracture Toughness (pages 84–87)

      S. Guo, R. Sivakumar and Y. Kagawa

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600169

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are one of the most studied nanomaterials for a broad range of applications because of their unique mechanical and physical properties. This made applications of the CNT for reinforcements of metal, polymer and ceramic matrix composites an important topic of interest. In this paper, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are homogeneously dispersed in colloidal silica using attrition milling technique and the obtained powder mixtures are consolidated by spark-plasma sintering. The incorporation of CNT led to increase of elastic moduli and fracture toughness of the nanocomposites. In particular, fracture toughness of the nanocomposites increased by a factor of ∼2 due to the incorporation of CNT.

    2. Enhanced Field-Emission Obtained from NiO Coated Carbon Nanotubes (pages 88–91)

      C. J. Yang, J. I. Park and Y. R. Cho

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600003

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      NiO coated carbon nanotube(CNT) were successfully synthesized by electroless coating process and subsequent oxidation. NiO coated CNT emitters showed improved field-emission properties and could be applied to field emitters for highly efficient emissive devices.

    3. Coaxial Nanorods of MgO Core with Si Shell Layers (pages 92–95)

      H. W. Kim and S. H. Shim

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600192

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This article demonstrates an approach to the synthesis of MgO/Si core-shell nanorods. The Si shell was close to amorphous, whereas the MgO core was crystalline with a cubic structure. The PL of the Si-coated products under excitation at 325 nm exhibited a visible light emission, which was almost identical to that of the uncoated ones.

    4. Large-Scale Synthesis of MoS2 Bucky Onions (pages 96–98)

      X. C. Song, Y. Zhao, Y. F. Zheng and E. Yang

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600209

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The MoS2 Bucky Onions with nesting spherical layered closed-cage structure were obtained by MoS3 precursors heated at high temperature in hydrogen atmosphere. The MoS2 Bucky Onions are spherical particles with diameter ranging 60–200 nm.

    5. One-Step Production of Organized Surface Architectures on Polymeric Materials by Direct Laser Interference Patterning (pages 99–103)

      A. F. Lasagni, D. F. Acevedo, C. A. Barbero and F. Mücklich

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600171

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this communication, we report a novel method for the advanced design of architectures in polymers in a single step process. Direct Laser Interference Patterning (DLIP) permits the fabrication of repetitive 1D and 2D patterns and microstructures by direct irradiation of the sample surface with coherent beams of light. In addition, the most important advantage of this method is that no additional process steps (i.e. etching, development of photoresist) are required.

    6. Plasma Spray Process On-Line Control by Artificial Intelligence Methodology (pages 105–113)

      A.-F. Kanta, G. Montavon, M.-P. Planche and C. Coddet

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600215

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Parametric drifts and fluctuations occur during plasma spraying. These drifts and fluctuations originate especially from the electrode wear and intrinsic plasma jet instabilities: the plasma net power varies in this case modifying significantly its thermodynamic properties hence modifying the momentum and heat transfers to the particles. It is possible to control the in-flight particle characteristics by adjusting continuously the operating parameters, in particular the power parameters. Due to the large amplitudes of these drifts and fluctuations, the strategy to adopt will depend on the required corrections to apply to the particle characteristics.

    7. Fabrication of High Performance 2.5D SiO2f/Si3N4-BN Composites for High-temperature Application (pages 114–116)

      Y.-G. Jiang, C.-R. Zhang, F. Cao, S.-Q. Wang, H.-F. Hu and G.-J. Qi

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600108

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A radar window for a re-entry vehicle should process critical mechanical properties. Fused silica, BN and Si3N4 ceramics are the three popular materials for such applications, but are limited in some fields for their intrinsic disadvantages. In the present study, 2.5 dimensional silica fiber reinforced Si3N4-BN matrix composites were prepared by a PIP method through repeated infiltration of hybrid precursor and pyrolysis at high temperature in ammonia atmosphere.

    8. Asymptotic Back Strain Approach for Estimation of Effective Properties of Multiphase Materials (pages 117–120)

      A. A. Gusev

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600117

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Estimation of the effective properties of composite materials from those of the constituents and the material's morphology is a classical problem of both theoretical and technological interest. In this work, the authors have introduced an asymptotic back strain finite element approach for numerical estimation of effective properties of multiphase materials. The proposed approach should open an appealing pathway to rational and effective computer aided design of random microstructure composite materials.

    9. Accelerated Aging of Bituminous Binders Using a High Frequency Torsional Rheometer (pages 121–128)

      D. Valtorta, L. D. Poulikakos, E. Connery, M. N. Partl and E. Mazza

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600203

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Aging in bituminous binders is a process induced by chemical and physical changes during the production of the pavement and throughout its service life, manifesting itself with progressive embrittlement and pavement deterioration. The aging process can be monitored by using dynamic shear rheometers, whose response is related to the viscoelastic material properties of the bituminous binder sample analyzed. A high frequency torsional rheometer (HFTR) is presented in this paper as a portable fingerprinting tool for material characterization. This device is used to monitor the viscoelastic changes of bituminous binders, quantifying the influence of pressure and temperature on the binder deterioration.

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