Advanced Engineering Materials

Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 3

March, 2007

Volume 9, Issue 3

Pages 135–211

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. International News
    5. Communications
    1. Cover Picture: Mechanical Properties and Impact Resistance of a New Transparent Glass-Ceramic (Adv. Eng. Mater. 3/2007)

      T. Berthier da Cunha, J. P. Wu, O. Peitl, V. M. Fokin, E. D. Zanotto, L. Iannucci and A. R. Boccaccini

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200790005

      Transparent glass-ceramics appear to be an ideal material for advanced armour applications due to their relatively good transparency, low density, relatively high fracture strength and chemical stability. The ballistic (low impact velocity) impact resitance of novel transparent glass-ceramics has been investigated. It was found that hardness, fracture toughness and brittleness index of the glass-ceramics have a profound effect on impact damage development at different projectile impact energies.

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. International News
    5. Communications
    1. Contents: Adv. Eng. Mater. 3/2007 (pages 135–138)

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200790003

  3. International News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. International News
    5. Communications
    1. International News: Adv. Eng. Mater. 3/2007 (pages 139–142)

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200790004

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. International News
    5. Communications
    1. The Physical Nature of Materials Strengths (pages 143–146)

      Z.-F. Zhang and J. Eckert

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600232

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The strength of a material is assessed most often by means of a tensile test. For a given material the fracture strength can be calculated by σF = Fmax/A0. For a bulk metallic glassy specimen, it often fails in a shear mode, and the shear fracture surface makes an angle of θT=56° with respect to the tension axis. Such shear fracture behavior has been widely observed in many metallic glasses. Consequently, this gives rise to some interesting and significant questions. Which is the real tensile strength of a metallic glass? Why do metallic glasses often fail neither along the maximum normal stress plane (θT =90°) nor along the maximum shear stress plane (θT = 45°) under tensile loading? What is the physical nature of the materials strength?

    2. Compressive Deformation and Fracture of a Hollow Bulk-Metallic Glass (pages 147–150)

      W. H. Jiang, K. Q. Qiu, F. X. Liu, H. Choo and P. K. Liaw

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600249

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Plastic deformation and fracture of a bulk-metallic glass rod with a concentric hollow in compression were investigated. The specimen exhibits a substantial plastic deformation before failure. A number of shear bands form at both outer and inner surfaces of the specimen. Fracture surface shows substantially ductile features. These results indicate that the bulk-metallic glass has a high intrinsic ductility and the specimen's geometry can delay effectively premature fracture.

    3. Nanocrystallized Al92Sm8 Amorphous Alloy Investigated by High-Resolution Microscopy and 3D Atom-Probe Analysis (pages 151–155)

      T. Gloriant, F. Danoix, W. Lefebvre and A. L. Greer

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600222

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A partially nanocrystallized amorphous Al92Sm8 (at.%) alloy was obtained directly by rapid solidification (one-step method). Because of the significant retained plasticity of the as-quenched alloy, the nanostructure and the atomic species distribution within the nanocomposite material could be characterized by field-ion microscopy (FIM) and by three-dimensional atom-probe analysis (3DAP).

    4. Thickness and Clearance Effects in Shear Punch Testing (pages 157–160)

      R. K. Guduru, A. V. Nagasekhar, R. O. Scattergood, C. C. Koch and K. L. Murty

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600255

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Shear punch testing (SPT) is a miniaturized specimen testing technique and is often used to predict the tensile properties of metals and alloys by testing a small amount of material. In order to rationalize the testing methodology it is necessary to understand the effect of different testing procedure parameters such as specimen thickness and die-punch clearance on the evaluated mechanical properties. We present our understanding of the above parameters on the SPT yield strength using finite element modeling studies in conjunction with our previous experimental results.

    5. Microstructure Improvement in Weld Metal Using Ultrasonic Vibrations (pages 161–163)

      Y. Cui, C. Xu and Q. Han

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600228

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The ultrasonic vibration is used to refine the 316L weld metal microstructure. The test results show that the fraction of columnar dendritic microstructure in weld metal is as function of output of ultrasonic vibration. With the increase of the output from 0 to 90, the ratio of the columnar dendritic microstructure decrease significantly, from 95 % dendritic microstructure to 10 %.

    6. Sintering of High Wear Resistant Metal Matrix Composites (pages 165–170)

      S. Weber and W. Theisen

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600257

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Particle reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) based on cold work tool steels are increasingly used as wear resistant materials. Superior wear properties compared to commonly used wear resistant materials justify their application. Usually such materials are produced by means of powder metallurgy (PM) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP), a comparatively cost-intensive process. Against this background a sintering route based on super solidus liquid phase sintering (SLPS) was developed to obtain MMC with properties comparable to those produced by means of HIP. This publication points out the processing route in detail and focuses on the resulting microstructures. Finally, some results of wear tests are presented in comparison to MMC produced by HIP (HIP-MMC).

    7. Study of Liquid Impact Erosion in B2-NiTi and Ti3Al Based Intermetallic Matrix Composites on Laser Alloyed Ti-6Al-4V (pages 171–176)

      M. Duraiselvam, R. Galun, S. Siegmann, V. Wesling and B. L. Mordike

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600227

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      B2-NiTi and α2-Ti3Al based single and dual-phase intermetallic matrix composites (IMC) with TiC reinforcement was laser alloyed on Ti-6Al-4V using Ni/Al-VC and Al-Cr3C2 alloy powder mixtures. The microstructural characterisation of alloyed layers was carried out by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and elasto-plastic properties of the specimens were determined using Depth-sensing indentation (DSI) experiment. The erosion resistance of the specimens was evaluated using high-speed liquid impact test and an attempt was made to correlate the erosion resistance with DSI derived mechanical properties and microstructural features.

    8. Recent Insights into the Mechanism of Magnesium Corrosion and Research Suggestions (pages 177–183)

      G. Song and A. Atrens

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600221

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The opportunity to give an invited presentation to the Gordon Research Conference – Aqueous Corrosion in 2006 and reflections on the discussion at the conference were used to review our understanding of Mg corrosion mechanism, to generate new insights, to identify gaps in our knowledge and to identify research opportunities.

    9. Interaction Between an Imidazolium Based Ionic Liquid and the AZ91D Magnesium Alloy (pages 185–190)

      S. Caporali, F. Ghezzi, A. Giorgetti, A. Lavacchi, A. Tolstogouzov and U. Bardi

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600250

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Knowledge about the corrosion mechanisms of magnesium alloy (AZ91D) in Ionic Liquids (IL) is of fundamental interest because of the absence of water in these environments which eliminates hydrogen corrosion. Furthermore IL show remarkable properties that make them ideal lubricant materials. The corrosion rate is very slow at room temperature, but becomes much faster at 200 °C. A interaction layer is formed and at least two different processes contribute to its formation: the corrosion of the metals constituting the alloy and the adsorption of IL degradation products.

    10. Mechanical Properties and Impact Resistance of a New Transparent Glass-Ceramic (pages 191–196)

      T. Berthier da Cunha, J. P. Wu, O. Peitl, V. M. Fokin, E. D. Zanotto, L. Iannucci and A. R. Boccaccini

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600237

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Transparent glass-ceramics appear to be an ideal material for advanced armour applications due to their relatively good transparency, low density, relatively high fracture strength and chemical stability. The ballistic (low impact velocity) impact resitance of novel transparent glass-ceramics has been investigated. It was found that hardness, fracture toughness and brittleness index of the glass-ceramics have a profound effect on impact damage development at different projectile impact energies.

    11. Water-Based Tape Casting of Alumina and Mullite Substrates for Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Development (pages 197–200)

      F. M. M. Snijkers, J. van Hoolst, M. Schoeters and J. J. Luyten

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600265

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Alumina and mullite substrates for the development of crystalline silicon solar cells were produced by water-based tape-casting with acryl latex binder. The suspension composition was optimized by assessment of the reological properties of alumina suspensions. The optimal dispersant concentration for highest maximal solid loading increases with increasing content of latex binder. It was found that thicker tapes could be produced due to decreasing sensitivity for crack formation if a higher ratio of binder to ceramic is used.

    12. Self-catalyzed Growth of Nonstoichiometric Single-crystal Mullite Nanocolumns (pages 201–203)

      L. Liang, J. B. Li, H. Lin, G. F. Guo and M. S. He

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600217

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The nonstoichiometric Al-rich single-crystal mullite nanocolumns were prepared by sol-gel method through the self-catalyzed growth process. The rectangular nanocolumns are straight and uniform with a width of 100–150 nm and length of 3–4 μm. Detailed structural characterizations suggested that the growth of this novel nonstoichiometric structure was induced by the self-catalyzed process thanks to the presence of surface excess Al adlayers on mullite surfaces.

    13. Hollow Fibers of Lanthanum Cerium Oxide Prepared by Electrospinning (pages 205–207)

      J. Y. Li, H. Dai, X. H. Zhong, Y. F. Zhang and X. Q. Cao

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600214

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The lanthanum cerium in the fiber is formed by calcination of the electrospinning fibers of polymer/inorganic composite at 600 °C and a polycrystalline hollow fiber with diameter of 1∼5 μm can be obtained at 1000 °C for 12 h. After calcination at 1400 °C, the lanthanum cerium grains are closely connected to each other with clear grain boundaries and the hollow structure can be observed in the cross-section of the fiber.

    14. Damping Properties of Nanoporous Carbon-Cyclohexane Mixtures (pages 209–211)

      V. K. Punyamurtula, A. Han and Y. Qiao

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/adem.200600177

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      When functionalized by a nanoporous carbon, cyclohexane exhibits a pronounced energy absorption characteristic under cyclic loadings, which can be applied for advanced protection or damping systems. The energy absorption mechanism is related to the pressure induced infiltration, with the solid-liquid interfacial tension being amplified by the large surface area of the nanoporous phase.

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