A Hierarchically Structured Ni(OH)2 Monolayer Hollow-Sphere Array and Its Tunable Optical Properties over a Large Region

Authors

  • G. Duan,

    1. Key Lab of Materials Physics, Anhui Key Lab of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031, P.R. China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • W. Cai,

    1. Key Lab of Materials Physics, Anhui Key Lab of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031, P.R. China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Y. Luo,

    1. Key Lab of Materials Physics, Anhui Key Lab of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031, P.R. China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • F. Sun

    1. Key Lab of Materials Physics, Anhui Key Lab of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031, P.R. China
    Search for more papers by this author

  • The authors acknowledge the financial support from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 50502032), Natural Science Foundation of the Anhui Province (Grant No. 050440 902), and the Major State research program of China “Fundamental Investigation on Micro-Nano Sensors and Systems based on BNI Fusion” (Grant No. 2006CB300402). The authors also thank one of the referees of this article for his good suggestions that made this work progress further.

Abstract

The fabrication of a hierarchically structured Ni(OH)2 monolayer hollow-sphere array with the shell composed of building blocks of nanoflakelets is demonstrated based on a colloidal monolayer and electrochemical deposition. The morphology can be easily controlled by the colloidal monolayer and deposition parameters. Importantly, such monolayer hollow-sphere array shows a morphology- and size-dependent tunable optical transmission stop band. This stop band can be easily tuned from 455–1855 nm by changing the size of the hollow spheres between 1000 and 4500 nm, and also fine-adjusted by changing the deposition time. The array exhibits a nearly incident-angle-independent position of the stop band that 3D photonic crystals do not possess. This structure may have potential applications in optical devices, photonic crystals, and sensors for gas detection.

Ancillary