Electrodeposition of Inorganic/Organic Hybrid Thin Films

Authors

  • Tsukasa Yoshida,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center of Innovative Photovoltaic Systems, Gifu University Yanagido 1-1, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)
    2. Environmental and Renewable Energy Systems Division Graduate School of Engineering, Gifu University Yanagido 1-1, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)
    • Center of Innovative Photovoltaic Systems, Gifu University Yanagido 1-1, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan).
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  • Jingbo Zhang,

    1. Environmental and Renewable Energy Systems Division Graduate School of Engineering, Gifu University Yanagido 1-1, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)
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  • Daisuke Komatsu,

    1. Environmental and Renewable Energy Systems Division Graduate School of Engineering, Gifu University Yanagido 1-1, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)
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  • Seiichi Sawatani,

    1. Environmental and Renewable Energy Systems Division Graduate School of Engineering, Gifu University Yanagido 1-1, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)
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  • Hideki Minoura,

    1. Environmental and Renewable Energy Systems Division Graduate School of Engineering, Gifu University Yanagido 1-1, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)
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  • Thierry Pauporté,

    1. Laboratoire d'Electrochimie et Chimie Analytique, UMR-CNRS 7575 École Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Paris 11 rue P. et M. Curie, 75231 Paris cedex 05 (France)
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  • Daniel Lincot,

    1. Laboratoire d'Electrochimie et Chimie Analytique, UMR-CNRS 7575 École Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Paris 11 rue P. et M. Curie, 75231 Paris cedex 05 (France)
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  • Torsten Oekermann,

    1. Institut für Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie, Universität Hannover Callinstrasse 3-3A, 30167 Hannover (Germany)
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  • Derck Schlettwein,

    1. Institut für Angewandte Physik Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen Ludwigstrasse23, 35390 Giessen (Germany)
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  • Hirokazu Tada,

    1. Institute for Molecular Science Higashiyama 5-1, Myodaiji-cho Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)
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  • Dieter Wöhrle,

    1. Institut für Organische und Makromolekulare Chemie, Universität Bremen 28334 Bremen (Germany)
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  • Kazumasa Funabiki,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Technology Faculty of Engineering, Gifu University Yanagido 1-1, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)
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  • Masaki Matsui,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Technology Faculty of Engineering, Gifu University Yanagido 1-1, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)
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  • Hidetoshi Miura,

    1. Chemicrea Inc., Quattro Muromachi Bldg. 9F 4-16 Nihonbashi Muromachi Chuoh-ku, Tokyo 103-0022 (Japan)
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  • Hisao Yanagi

    1. Graduate School of Materials Science Nara Institute of Science and Technology Takayama-cho 8916-5, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)
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Abstract

Electrodeposition of inorganic compound thin films in the presence of certain organic molecules results in self-assembly of various hybrid thin films with new properties. Examples of new discoveries by the authors are reviewed, taking cathodic formation of a ZnO/dye hybrid as the leading example. Hybridization of eosinY leads to the formation of highly oriented porous crystalline ZnO as the consequence of dye loading. The hybrid formation is a highly complicated process involving complex chemistry of many molecular and ionic constituents. However, electrochemical analyses of the relevant phenomena indicate the possibility of reaching a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism, giving us the chance to further develop them into industrial technologies. The porous crystals are ideal for photoelectrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells. As the process also permits the use of non-heat-resistant substrates, the technology can be applied for the development of colorful and light-weight plastic solar cells.

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