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Initiated and Oxidative Chemical Vapor Deposition of Polymeric Thin Films: iCVD and oCVD

Authors

  • Wyatt E. Tenhaeff,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA. 02139 (USA)
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  • Karen K. Gleason

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical Engineering Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA. 02139 (USA)
    • Department of Chemical Engineering Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA. 02139 (USA)
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  • This research was supported in part by, the US Army through the Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, under Contract DAAD-19-02-0002 with the US Army Research Office. The authors acknowledge the support of both the NIH, under funding Contract No. NO1-NS2-2347, and the NSF/SRC Engineering Research Center for Environmentally Benign Semiconductor Manufacturing. This work in part made use of MRSEC Shared facilities at MIT supported by the National Science Foundation under Award Number MR-400334. We thank the DuPont Alliance for financial support. (Supporting Information is available online from Wiley InterScience or from the author).

Abstract

The techniques of initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) and oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) enable the fabrication of chemically well-defined thin polymeric films on complex objects with micro- and nano-scale features. By depositing polymers from the vapor phase, many wetting and solution effects are avoided, and conformal films can be created. In iCVD, a variant of hot filament CVD, the deposition rate is enhanced and chemical functionalities of the polymers' constituents are maintained by including a thermally labile initiator in the feed stream. Due to the low energy required when using an initiator, delicate substrates can be coated. In oCVD, infusible, electrically conductive films are formed directly on the substrate of interest as the oxidant and monomer are introduced into the reactor simultaneously. This Feature Article provides an overview of the work that has been done to develop iCVD and oCVD into platform technologies. Relevant background, fundamentals, and applications will be discussed.

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