Platinum Lead Nanostructures: Formation, Phase Behavior, and Electrocatalytic Properties

Authors

  • Shengchun Yang,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Rochester, 206 Gavett Hall, Rochester, NY 14627 (USA)
    2. State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University Shaanxi 710049 (PR China)
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  • Zhenmeng Peng,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Rochester, 206 Gavett Hall, Rochester, NY 14627 (USA)
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  • Hong Yang

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Rochester, 206 Gavett Hall, Rochester, NY 14627 (USA)
    • Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Rochester, 206 Gavett Hall, Rochester, NY 14627 (USA).
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  • This work was supported by U.S. National Science Foundation (DMR-0449849) and the Donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund (ACS-PRF 42446-G10). It made use of FEI Tecnai F-20 microscope at the Cornell Center for Materials Research (CCMR) supported by NSF (DMR-0520404). We thank Mr. John Grazul of Cornell University for help in running the HR-TEM. S. C. Y. is a visiting student from Xi'an Jiaotong University. All research work presented in this paper was conducted exclusively at University of Rochester.

Abstract

This paper describes the synthesis and crystal phase behavior of platinum lead nanorods. Both face-centered cubic (fcc) Pt100−xPbx (x < 50) and hexagonally close-packed (hcp) Pt50Pb50 nanostructures are synthesized at mild reaction temperatures (180–200 °C). The crystal phase and composition of these PtPb nanorods can be controlled by changing the reaction time and temperature. A mechanism for the formation of either kinetically or thermodynamically stable PtPb nanorods is discussed. The approach developed for controlling crystal phases at fairly low temperatures can be important for the design of alloy or intermetallic nanostructures for a broader range of applications.

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