Nitrogen-Enriched Nonporous Carbon Electrodes with Extraordinary Supercapacitance

Authors

  • Denisa Hulicova-Jurcakova,

    Corresponding author
    1. ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials The University of Queensland St. Lucia 4072, QLD (Australia)
    • ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials The University of Queensland St. Lucia 4072, QLD (Australia).
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  • Masaya Kodama,

    1. Energy Technology Research Institute National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology Onogawa 16-1, Tsukuba 305-8569, Ibaraki (Japan)
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  • Soshi Shiraishi,

    1. Department of Nano-Material Systems, Gunma University Tenjincho 1-5-1, Kiryu 376-8515, Gunma (Japan)
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  • Hiroaki Hatori,

    1. Energy Technology Research Institute National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology Onogawa 16-1, Tsukuba 305-8569, Ibaraki (Japan)
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  • Zong Hua Zhu,

    1. School of Engineering, The University of Queensland St Lucia 4072, QLD (Australia)
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  • Gao Qing Lu

    Corresponding author
    1. ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials The University of Queensland St. Lucia 4072, QLD (Australia)
    • ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials The University of Queensland St. Lucia 4072, QLD (Australia).
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Abstract

Nitrogen-enriched nonporous carbon materials derived from melamine–mica composites are subjected to ammonia treatment to further increase the nitrogen content. For samples preoxidized prior to the ammonia treatment, the nitrogen content is doubled and is mainly incorporated in pyrrol-like groups. The materials are tested as electrodes for supercapacitors, and in acidic or basic electrolytes, the gravimetric capacitance of treated samples is three times higher than that of untreated samples. This represents a tenfold increase of the capacitance per surface area (3300 µF cm−2) in basic electrolyte. Due to the small volume of the carbon materials, high volumetric capacitances are achieved in various electrolytic systems: 280 F cm−3 in KOH, 152 F cm−3 in H2SO4, and 92 F cm−3 in tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate/propylene carbonate.

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