Interfacial Polar-Bonding-Induced Multifunctionality of Nano-Silicon in Mesoporous Silica

Authors

  • Jung Y. Huang,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University 1001 Ta-Hsueh Road, Hsinchu 30050 (Taiwan ROC)
    • Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University 1001 Ta-Hsueh Road, Hsinchu 30050 (Taiwan ROC).
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  • Jia M. Shieh,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University 1001 Ta-Hsueh Road, Hsinchu 30050 (Taiwan ROC)
    2. National Nano Device Laboratories 26 Prosperity Road 1, Hsinchu 30078 (Taiwan ROC)
    • Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University 1001 Ta-Hsueh Road, Hsinchu 30050 (Taiwan ROC).
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  • Hao C. Kuo,

    1. Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University 1001 Ta-Hsueh Road, Hsinchu 30050 (Taiwan ROC)
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  • Ci L. Pan

    1. Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University 1001 Ta-Hsueh Road, Hsinchu 30050 (Taiwan ROC)
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Abstract

The optoelectronic response of a material governs its suitability for a wide range of applications, from photon detection to photovoltaic conversion. To conquer the material limitations and achieve improved optoelectronic responses, nanotechnology has been employed to arrange subunits with specific size-dependent quantum mechanical properties in a hierarchically organized structure. However, building a functional optoelectronic system from nano-objects remains a formidable challenge. In this paper, the fabrication of a new artificially engineered optoelectronic material by the preferential growth of silicon nanocrystals on the bottom of the pore-channels of mesoporous silica is reported. The nanocrystals form highly stable interface structures bonded on one side; these structure show strong electron–phonon coupling and a ferroelectric-like hysteretic switching property. A new class of multifunctional materials is realized by invoking a concept that employs semiconductor nanocrystals for optical sensing and utilizes interfacial polar layers to facilitate carrier transport and emulate ferroelectric-like switching.

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