Inside Front Cover: A Unique Microcracking Process Associated with the Inelastic Deformation of Haversian Bone (Adv. Funct. Mater. 1/2009)

Authors

  • Vincent Ebacher,

    1. Department of Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia 309-6350 Stores Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4 (Canada)
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  • Rizhi Wang

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia 309-6350 Stores Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4 (Canada)
    • Department of Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia 309-6350 Stores Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4 (Canada).
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Abstract

original image

Human cortical bone is capable of adapting to the mechanical environment through dynamic remodeling of the Haversian systems. The presence of Haversian canals, however, also introduces stress concentration and could have detrimental effects on the fracture resistance of bone. How is the hierarchical structure in bone designed to alleviate such stress concentrations? On page 57, Vincent Ebacher and Rizhi Wang report a unique and stable microcracking process accompanying the inelastic deformation of Haversian bone. The results lead to the critical role of the well-organized bone lamellae surrounding each Haversian canal.

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