Enzyme-Based Nanoscale Composites for Use as Active Decontamination Surfaces

Authors

  • Cerasela Zoica Dinu,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center and Center for Biotechnology & Interdisciplinary Studies Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy, NY 12180 (USA)
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  • Guangyu Zhu,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center and Center for Biotechnology & Interdisciplinary Studies Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy, NY 12180 (USA)
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  • Shyam Sundhar Bale,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center and Center for Biotechnology & Interdisciplinary Studies Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy, NY 12180 (USA)
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  • Gaurav Anand,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center and Center for Biotechnology & Interdisciplinary Studies Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy, NY 12180 (USA)
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  • Philippa J. Reeder,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center and Center for Biotechnology & Interdisciplinary Studies Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy, NY 12180 (USA)
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  • Karl Sanford,

    1. Genencor International Palo Alto, CA 94304 (USA)
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  • Gregg Whited,

    1. Genencor International Palo Alto, CA 94304 (USA)
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  • Ravi S. Kane,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center and Center for Biotechnology & Interdisciplinary Studies Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy, NY 12180 (USA)
    • Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center and Center for Biotechnology & Interdisciplinary Studies Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy, NY 12180 (USA).
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  • Jonathan S. Dordick

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center and Center for Biotechnology & Interdisciplinary Studies Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy, NY 12180 (USA)
    • Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center and Center for Biotechnology & Interdisciplinary Studies Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy, NY 12180 (USA).
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Abstract

Perhydrolase S54V (AcT) effectively catalyzes the perhydrolysis of propylene glycol diacetate (PGD) to generate peracetic acid (PAA). PAA is a potent oxidant used for sanitization and disinfection, with broad effectiveness against bacteria, yeasts, fungi, and spores. In this study, active and stable composites are developed by incorporating AcT–carbon nanotube conjugates into polymer and latex-based paint. At a conjugate loading of 0.16% (w/v), the composite generated 11 mM PAA in 20 min, capable of killing more than 99% spores initially charged at 106 colony-forming units per milliliter.

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