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A Controllable Self-Assembly Method for Large-Scale Synthesis of Graphene Sponges and Free-Standing Graphene Films

Authors

  • Fei Liu,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (BK21 program) and Institute for the BioCentury KAIST 335 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea)
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  • Tae Seok Seo

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (BK21 program) and Institute for the BioCentury KAIST 335 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea)
    • Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (BK21 program) and Institute for the BioCentury KAIST 335 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea).
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Abstract

A simple method to prepare large-scale graphene sponges and free-standing graphene films using a speed vacuum concentrator is presented. During the centrifugal evaporation process, the graphene oxide (GO) sheets in the aqueous suspension are assembled to generate network-linked GO sponges or a series of multilayer GO films, depending on the temperature of a centrifugal vacuum chamber. While sponge-like bulk GO materials (GO sponges) are produced at 40 °C, uniform free-standing GO films of size up to 9 cm2 are generated at 80 °C. The thickness of GO films can be controlled from 200 nm to 1 µm based on the concentration of the GO colloidal suspension and evaporation temperature. The synthesized GO films exhibit excellent transparency, typical fluorescent emission signal, and high flexibility with a smooth surface and condensed density. Reduced GO sponges and films with less than 5 wt% oxygen are produced through a thermal annealing process at 800 °C with H2/Ar flow. The structural flexibility of the reduced GO sponges, which have a highly porous, interconnected, 3D network, as well as excellent electrochemical properties of the reduced GO film with respect to electrode kinetics for the [Fe(CN)6]3−/4− redox system, are demonstrated.

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