Materials for Printable, Transparent, and Low-Voltage Transistors

Authors

  • Jia Sun,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 206 Maryland Hall, 3400 North, Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • Bo Zhang,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 206 Maryland Hall, 3400 North, Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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  • Howard E. Katz

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 206 Maryland Hall, 3400 North, Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 206 Maryland Hall, 3400 North, Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.
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Abstract

Since the 1990s, printable, transparent, and low-voltage transistors have attracted great attention from academia and industry due to the demand for specialized circuitry such as in radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags, medical sensors, and electronically active textiles. Some flexible and portable devices have been available commercially; however, the challenge to convert more conceptual devices into real-life applications is still the materials. This article starts with a brief summary of some examples from silicon electronics, to place the other materials in context, followed by the topics including high-capacitance dielectrics, transparent conductors and semiconductors, and printability of recently developed electronic materials. The recent progress about these topics is reviewed, and discussions of each topic suggest future science and engineering research opportunities.

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