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A Systematic Approach to Building Highly Porous, Noninterpenetrating Metal–Organic Frameworks with a Large Capacity for Adsorbing H2 and CH4

Authors

  • Jeong Yong Lee,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA; Fax: (+1) 732–445-5312
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  • Long Pan,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA; Fax: (+1) 732–445-5312
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  • Xiaoying Huang,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA; Fax: (+1) 732–445-5312
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  • Thomas J. Emge,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA; Fax: (+1) 732–445-5312
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  • Jing Li

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA; Fax: (+1) 732–445-5312
    • Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA; Fax: (+1) 732–445-5312
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Abstract

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Highly porous metal organic framework materials having closely related structures and systematically tunable porosity demonstrate a high capacity for methane and hydrogen adsorption. At room temperature and ≈40 bars, the compounds Zn(BDC)(TED)0.5 and Ni(NDC)(TED)0.5 adsorb 242 cm3 g−1 and 173 cm3 g−1 of CH4, respectively. At 77 K, they take up 4.1 and 5.5 wt% of hydrogen at 40 and 65 bars, respectively.

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