Dynamic Stability of Organic Conducting Polymers and Its Replication in Electrical Conduction and Degradation Mechanisms

Authors

  • Emmanuel F. C. Chimamkpam,

    1. CICECO, Centre for Research in Ceramics and Composite Materials, Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810–193 Aveiro, Portugal
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  • Thomas Schweizer,

    1. ETHZ, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Institut fur Polymere, Department of Materials Science, HCI H531 Wolfgang-Pauli Str. 10, CH8093 Zurich, Switzerland
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  • Roland Hauert,

    1. Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland
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  • Andreas Schilling,

    1. Physics Institute, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH8057 Zurich, Switzerland
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  • José M. F. Ferreira

    Corresponding author
    1. CICECO, Centre for Research in Ceramics and Composite Materials, Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810–193 Aveiro, Portugal
    • CICECO, Centre for Research in Ceramics and Composite Materials, Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810–193 Aveiro, Portugal.
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Abstract

The evolving usefulness of organic conducting polymers, of metallic or semiconducting type, is primarily dependent on their mechanisms of electrical conduction and degradation. Understanding these mechanisms is crucial for improving the efficiency and lifetime of technologies derived from this class of polymers. There is demand for a model that provides a vivid and more precise evaluation of the electrical conduction mechanism in these polymers – especially when they act as hosts to guest species, such as acid dopant ions and nanoparticles. If, for example, the motional behavior of a host–guest organic conducting polymer structure, as related to dynamic stability, is either asynchronous or synchronous, is this reflected in the mechanism of electrical conduction and does it account for the pace of material's degradation? Here, we demonstrate that the answer is affirmative: asynchronous structural motions arising due to loosely bound or free guest species within the host polymer lead to anomalous electrical conduction mechanisms, increased fragility and short lifetime, at odds with the synchronous behavior.

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