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Ovonic Memory Switching in Multimaterial Fibers

Authors

  • Sylvain Danto,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    2. Research Laboratory of Electronics, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
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  • Zachary Ruff,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    2. Research Laboratory of Electronics, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
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  • Zheng Wang,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    2. Research Laboratory of Electronics, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
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  • John D. Joannopoulos,

    1. Research Laboratory of Electronics, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
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  • Yoel Fink

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    2. Research Laboratory of Electronics, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    3. Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
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Abstract

We demonstrate the first rewritable memory in thermally drawn fibers. A high tellurium-content chalcogenide glass, contacted by metallic electrodes internal to the fiber structure, is drawn from a macroscopic preform. An externally applied voltage is utilized to switch between a high resistance (OFF) and a low resistance (ON) state; this in turn allows the fibers to function as a memory device reminiscent of the ovonic switch. The difference between the ON and OFF states is found to be four orders of magnitude. The glass–crystal phase transition is localized to micrometer-wide filaments, whose position can be optically controlled along the fiber axis. An architecture that enabled the encoding of multiple bits per fiber is described.

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