Antibacterial Coatings: Genetically Engineered Phage Fibers and Coatings for Antibacterial Applications (Adv. Funct. Mater. 2/2010)

Authors

  • Joan Y. Mao,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Department of Biological Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology 8-237, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • Angela M. Belcher,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Department of Biological Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology 8-237, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering Department of Biological Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology 8-237, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA).
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  • Krystyn J. Van Vliet

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Department of Biological Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology 8-237, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering Department of Biological Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology 8-237, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA).
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Abstract

original image

Genetic manipulation of viruses can be used to fabricate antibacterial fibers and coatings comprising crosslinked M13 bacteriophages, which are modified to bind silver ions. On page 209, Krystyn Van Vliet and co-workers demonstrate the bactericidal effects of such silverized phage fibers against several types of bacterial challenges including those potentially arising from use as wound dressings or antibacterial textiles.

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