Sensors: DNA Sensing Using Nanocrystalline Surface-Enhanced Al2O3 Nanopore Sensors (Adv. Funct. Mater. 8/2010)

Authors

  • Bala Murali Venkatesan,

    1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
    2. Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
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  • Amish B. Shah,

    1. Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
    2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
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  • Jian-Min Zuo,

    1. Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
    2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
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  • Rashid Bashir

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
    2. Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
    3. Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
    4. Department of Bioengineering University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
    • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA).
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Abstract

original image

R. Bashir and co-workers report on page 1266 the development of solid-state Al2O3 nanopore sensors with enhanced surface properties for the real-time detection and analysis of individual DNA molecules. The cover illustrates the extension of coiled double-stranded DNA in the high-field region surrounding a nanocrystalline Al2O3 nanopore, followed by DNA transport. Nanocrystallite nucleation during pore formation helps enhance the single-molecule sensitivity and surface-charge characteristics of these devices and enables the potential fabrication of nanometer-scale metallic contacts in the pore. This technology finds broad application in drug screening, medicine, and bio-nanotechnology.

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