Organic Field-Effect Transistors: Planarization of Polymeric Field-Effect Transistors: Improvement of Nanomorphology and Enhancement of Electrical Performance (Adv. Funct. Mater. 14/2010)

Authors

  • Kumar A. Singh,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA-15213 (USA)
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  • Tomasz Young,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University 4400 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA-15213 (USA)
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  • Richard D. McCullough,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University 4400 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA-15213 (USA)
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  • Tomasz Kowalewski,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University 4400 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA-15213 (USA)
    • Department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University 4400 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA-15213 (USA).
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  • Lisa M. Porter

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA-15213 (USA)
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA-15213 (USA).
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Abstract

original image

Contact geometry plays an important role in charge injection and transport in organic field-effect transistors. On page 2216, T. Kowalewski, L. M. Porter, et al. show a dramatic effect of electrode planarization on the polymer morphology at the contact edges and a resulting increase in fi eld-effect mobility in short channel length devices, and a corresponding decrease in contact resistance. The cover image shows atomic force micrograph of individual polymer nanofi brils spanning the length of a 10 µm channel transistor with planarized contacts.

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