Cross-Stacked Superaligned Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent and Stretchable Conductors

Authors

  • Kai Liu,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Physics and Tsinghua-Foxconn, Nanotechnology Research Center, Tsinghua University, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. China
    • Department of Physics and Tsinghua-Foxconn, Nanotechnology Research Center, Tsinghua University, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. China.
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  • Yinghui Sun,

    1. Department of Physics and Tsinghua-Foxconn, Nanotechnology Research Center, Tsinghua University, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. China
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  • Peng Liu,

    1. Department of Physics and Tsinghua-Foxconn, Nanotechnology Research Center, Tsinghua University, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. China
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  • Xiaoyang Lin,

    1. Department of Physics and Tsinghua-Foxconn, Nanotechnology Research Center, Tsinghua University, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. China
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  • Shoushan Fan,

    1. Department of Physics and Tsinghua-Foxconn, Nanotechnology Research Center, Tsinghua University, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. China
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  • Kaili Jiang

    1. Department of Physics and Tsinghua-Foxconn, Nanotechnology Research Center, Tsinghua University, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. China
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Abstract

Transparent and stretchable conductors are essential components in many stretchable electronics. However, it is still a challenge to make this kind of conductor easily and cost-effectively. Here, a way to utilize cross-stacked superaligned carbon nanotube films to make transparent and stretchable conductors is reported. The as-produced cross-stacked films are isotropic in electrical conductivity, but anisotropic in mechanical properties, because of their microscale cross structures. Along some directions, the films can sustain a high strain, of more than 35%, which is helpful for applications as stretchable conductors. These cross-stacked films can be further made into composite films with polyvinyl alcohol by a dip-coating method, and with polydimethylsiloxane by an embedding method. The former composite films have similar isotropic electrical and anisotropic mechanical properties to SACNT films, but much larger capability in terms of tensile load. The latter composite films possess quite highly stretchable and reversible electrical behaviors, which can be used in stretchable touch panels, solar cells, strain sensors, and implanted conductors.

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