Get access

“Clinging-Microdroplet” Patterning Upon High-Adhesion, Pillar-Structured Silicon Substrates

Authors

  • Bin Su,

    1. Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Science (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, P. R. China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Shutao Wang,

    1. Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Science (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, P. R. China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jie Ma,

    1. Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Science (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, P. R. China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Yanlin Song,

    1. Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Science (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, P. R. China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lei Jiang

    Corresponding author
    1. Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Science (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, P. R. China
    2. School of Chemistry and Environment, Beihang University, Beijing 100191, P. R. China.
    • Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Science (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, P. R. China.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

The rapidly increasing research interest in nanodevices, including nanoelectronics, nano-optoelectronics, and sensing, requires the development of surface-patterning techniques to obtain large-scale arrays of nanounits (mostly nanocrystals and/or nanoparticles) on a silicon substrate. Herein, we demonstrate a “clinging-microdroplet” method to fabricate patterning crystal arrays based on the employment of high-adhesion, superhydrophobic, pillar-structured silicon substrates. Different from the previous hydrophilic/hydrophobic patterned self-assembly monolayer technique, this method provides a novel strategy to fabricate patterning crystal arrays upon pillar-structured silicon substrates of homogenous superhydrophobicity and high adhesion, which greatly simplifies the modification process of the supporting substrates. Ordered crystal arrays with a tunable size and distribution density were successfully generated, and individual crystals grew on the top of each micropillar. Besides soluble inorganic materials, protein microspheres and suspending Ag-nanoparticle or polystyrene-microsphere aggregations could also be patterned in regular arrays, showing the wide adaptation of such an adhesive patterning technique. This novel and low-cost technique for patterning crystal arrays upon silicon substrates could yield breakthroughs in areas ranging from nanodevices to nanoelectronics.

Ancillary