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Direct Observation of Ag Filamentary Paths in Organic Resistive Memory Devices

Authors

  • Byungjin Cho,

    1. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-Dong, Buk-Gu, Gwangju 500-712, Korea
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  • Jin-Mun Yun,

    1. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-Dong, Buk-Gu, Gwangju 500-712, Korea
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  • Sunghoon Song,

    1. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-Dong, Buk-Gu, Gwangju 500-712, Korea
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  • Yongsung Ji,

    1. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-Dong, Buk-Gu, Gwangju 500-712, Korea
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  • Dong-Yu Kim,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-Dong, Buk-Gu, Gwangju 500-712, Korea
    • School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-Dong, Buk-Gu, Gwangju 500-712, Korea.
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  • Takhee Lee

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-Dong, Buk-Gu, Gwangju 500-712, Korea
    • School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-Dong, Buk-Gu, Gwangju 500-712, Korea.
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Abstract

We demonstrate bipolar switching of organic resistive memory devices consisting of Ag/polymer/heavily-doped p-type poly Si junctions in an 8 × 8 cross-bar array structure. The bistable switching mechanism appears to be related to the formation and rupture of highly conductive paths, as shown by a direct observation of Ag metallic bridges using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Current images of high- and low-conducting states acquired by conducting atomic force microscopy also support this filamentary switching mechanism. The filamentary formation can be described by an electrochemical redox reaction model of Ag. Our results may also be applied to other kinds of organic materials presenting similar switching properties, contributing to the optimization of device scaling or memory performance improvement.

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