Get access
Advertisement

Epoxy Ring Opening Phase Transfer as a General Route to Water Dispersible Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 Nanoparticles and Their Application as Positive MRI Contrast Agents

Authors

  • Tsedev Ninjbadgar,

    Corresponding author
    1. National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland
    • National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dermot F. Brougham

    Corresponding author
    1. National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland
    • National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

A novel and efficient method to produce water dispersible superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles is described. Nanoparticles prepared by non-hydrolytic organic phase methods are subsequently functionalized with (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane, a linker that prevents aggregation and is available for subsequent coupling reactions with a wide range of polymers and biomolecules. Ring opening coupling reactions were used to coat the epoxy-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles with aminated polymers (polyetheramines) or small molecules (arginine). The resulting nanoparticles, with hydrodynamic size of 13 nm, are found to be very stable over extended periods in water or PBS due to the presence of a dense stabilizer layer covalently anchored to the surface. Exceptionally high spin-lattice relaxivity, r1, values of 17 s−1 mM−1, and low r2/r1 ratios of 3.3–3.8 were exhibited in the clinical MRI frequency range, irrespective of the molecule selected for nanoparticle stabilization. As a result the dispersions are excellent candidates for incorporation into multi-functional assemblies or for use as positive contrast agent for MRI.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary