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Multifunctional ZnO-Nanowire-Based Sensor

Authors

  • Andreas Menzel,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Freiburg 79110, Germany
    • Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Freiburg 79110, Germany.
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  • Kittitat Subannajui,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Freiburg 79110, Germany
    • Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Freiburg 79110, Germany.
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  • Firat Güder,

    1. Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Freiburg 79110, Germany
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  • Dominik Moser,

    1. Microsystem Materials Laboratory, Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Freiburg 79110, Germany
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  • Oliver Paul,

    1. Microsystem Materials Laboratory, Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Freiburg 79110, Germany
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  • Margit Zacharias

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Freiburg 79110, Germany
    • Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Freiburg 79110, Germany.
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Abstract

A simple fabrication of ZnO-nanowire-based device and their implementation as a pH sensor, temperature sensor, and photo detector is reported. The presented multifunctional ZnO multiple-nanowire sensor platform contains a Au finger structure, which is realized by conventional photolithography on a SiO2 substrate. The nanowires are grown using thermal chemical vapor deposition. In order to detect the physical signals, changes in electrical signals were measured (conductance and current). For temperature sensing, the current behavior from 90 to 380 K under vacuum conditions exhibit a tunneling behavior between spaced nanowires. For photo sensing, the current response between the “on” and “off” states of light was measured when exposed to different wavelengths ranging from UV to visible light. Finally, for pH sensing the conductance was measured between a pH of 5 and 8.5. The ZnO nanowires were protected from chemical attacks by a thin layer of C4F8-plasma-based coating.

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