Novel Triclosan-Bound Hybrid-Silica Nanoparticles and their Enhanced Antimicrobial Properties

Authors

  • Igor Makarovsky,

    1. Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel
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  • Yonit Boguslavsky,

    1. Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel
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  • Maria Alesker,

    1. Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel
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  • Jonathan Lellouche,

    1. The Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Science, Institute for Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel
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  • Ehud Banin,

    1. The Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Science, Institute for Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel
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  • Jean-Paul Lellouche

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel
    • Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel.
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Abstract

The design and synthesis of novel hybrid-silica nanoparticles (NPs) containing the FDA-approved antimicrobial triclosan (Irgasan) covalently linked within the inorganic matrix for its controlled, slow release upon interaction, is reported. The NPs are in the range of 130 ± 30 nm in diameter, with a smooth and spherical morphology. Characterization of the hybrid-silica NPs containing triclosan, namely T-SNPs, and their appropriate linkers is accomplished by microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. Preliminary antimicrobial activity is studied through bacterial-growth experiments. The T-SNPs are found to be superior in killing bacteria, as compared with the free biocide.

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