Manipulating the Motion of Gold Aggregates Using Stimulus-Responsive Patterned Polymer Brushes as a Motor

Authors

  • Tao Chen,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, 01069, Germany
    • Department of Chemistry, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, 01069, Germany
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  • Debby P. Chang,

    1. Center for Biologically Inspired Materials and Materials Systems, and Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Physical Chemistry 1, Lund University, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden
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  • Jianming Zhang,

    1. Center for Biologically Inspired Materials and Materials Systems, and Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, USA
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  • Rainer Jordan,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, 01069, Germany
    • Department of Chemistry, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, 01069, Germany
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  • Stefan Zauscher

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Biologically Inspired Materials and Materials Systems, and Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, USA
    • Center for Biologically Inspired Materials and Materials Systems, and Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, USA.
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Abstract

An important goal and major challenge of material science and nanotechnology is building nanomotors for manipulating the motion of nanoparticles (NPs). Here, it is demonstrated that patterned, stimulus-responsive polymer brush microstructures can be used as motor arrays to manipulate the movement of gold NP aggregates in response to external stimuli that induce a conformational change in the brushes as the driving force. The motion of NP aggregates in the out-of-plane direction is achieved with displacements ranging from nanometers to sub-micrometers. These patterned polymer-brush microstructures can find applications as efficient motor arrays and nanosensors, and benefit the design of more complex nanodevices.

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