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Rapid and Facile Microwave-Assisted Surface Chemistry for Functionalized Microarray Slides

Authors

  • Jeong Heon Lee,

    1. Robotic Chemistry Group, Center for Molecular Imaging, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215
    2. Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215
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  • Hoon Hyun,

    1. Robotic Chemistry Group, Center for Molecular Imaging, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215
    2. Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215
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  • Conor J. Cross,

    1. Robotic Chemistry Group, Center for Molecular Imaging, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215
    2. Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215
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  • Maged Henary,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303
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  • Khaled A. Nasr,

    1. Robotic Chemistry Group, Center for Molecular Imaging, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215
    2. Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215
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  • Rafiou Oketokoun,

    1. Robotic Chemistry Group, Center for Molecular Imaging, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215
    2. Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215
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  • Hak Soo Choi,

    Corresponding author
    1. Robotic Chemistry Group, Center for Molecular Imaging, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215
    2. Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215
    • Robotic Chemistry Group, Center for Molecular Imaging, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215.

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  • John V. Frangioni

    Corresponding author
    1. Robotic Chemistry Group, Center for Molecular Imaging, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215
    2. Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215
    3. Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215
    • Robotic Chemistry Group, Center for Molecular Imaging, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215.

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Abstract

This report describes a rapid and facile method for surface functionalization and ligand patterning of glass slides based on microwave-assisted synthesis and a microarraying robot. The optimized reaction enables surface modification 42-times faster than conventional techniques and includes a carboxylated self-assembled monolayer, polyethylene glycol linkers of varying length, and stable amide bonds to small molecule, peptide, or protein ligands to be screened for binding to living cells. Customized slide racks that permit functionalization of 100 slides at a time to produce a cost-efficient, highly reproducible batch process. Ligand spots can be positioned on the glass slides precisely using a microarraying robot, and spot size adjusted for any desired application. Using this system, live cell binding to a variety of ligands is demonstrate and PEG linker length is optimized. Taken together, the technology we describe should enable high-throughput screening of disease-specific ligands that bind to living cells.

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