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Nanoarchitecture Multi-Structural Cathode Materials for High Capacity Lithium Batteries

Authors

  • Dapeng Wang,

    1. Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave. Argonne, IL 60439, USA
    2. State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY, 13902, USA
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  • Ilias Belharouak,

    Corresponding author
    1. Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave. Argonne, IL 60439, USA
    • Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave. Argonne, IL 60439, USA.
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  • Guangwen Zhou,

    1. State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY, 13902, USA
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  • Khalil Amine

    1. Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave. Argonne, IL 60439, USA
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Abstract

Lithium-rich composite cathodes have been extensively investigated for lithium-ion batteries. Nanoarchitecture hydroxide precursor for these cathodes with two levels of particle agglomeration (1–2 μm and 10 μm) is produced using a co-precipitation method. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction confirm that the precursor is a composite comprising transition metal hydroxides and Mn3O4. Cathode materials synthesized based on the precursor are “layered (Requation imagem)-layered (C2/m)-spinel (Fdequation imagem)” composite phase. The electrochemical performance of lithium cells utilizing this material as the cathode is determined to be excellent. Both the layered-layered-spinel composite structure and the nanoarchitecture morphology contribute to the electrochemical performance advantage of this material over other cathode materials.

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