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Vesicular Structures Self-Assembled from Oligonucleotide-Polymer Hybrids: Mechanical Prevention of Bacterial Colonization Upon their Surface Tethering Through Hybridization

Authors

  • Nicolas Cottenye,

    1. Institut de Science des Matériaux de Mulhouse, (IS2M, CNRS LRC 7228), 15 rue Jean Starcky, BP 2488, 68057 Mulhouse Cedex, France
    2. Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland
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  • Karine Anselme,

    1. Institut de Science des Matériaux de Mulhouse, (IS2M, CNRS LRC 7228), 15 rue Jean Starcky, BP 2488, 68057 Mulhouse Cedex, France
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  • Lydie Ploux,

    1. Institut de Science des Matériaux de Mulhouse, (IS2M, CNRS LRC 7228), 15 rue Jean Starcky, BP 2488, 68057 Mulhouse Cedex, France
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  • Corinne Vebert-Nardin

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry University of Geneva Quai Ernest-Ansermet, 30 CH-1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland
    • Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland.
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Abstract

In order to design soft coatings, surface tethering of vesicular structures self-assembled from oligonucleotide-polymer hybrids is achieved through hybridization. Watson-Crick base-pairing occurs between the nucleotide sequences involved in the self-assembly and their surface-tethered complementary sequences. Combining the quartz crystal microbalance and in situ observations using confocal laser scanning microscopy, it is evidenced that the vesicles retain their morphology even under flow stress. Surprisingly, these soft surfaces prevent bacterial colonization.

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