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Observation of Filamentous Nanostructures in Organic-Inorganic Composite Thin Films Deposited by Co-Evaporation

Authors

  • Daniela Donhauser,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institut für Hochfrequenztechnik, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Schleinitzstraße 22, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany
    2. InnovationLab GmbH, Speyererstraße 4, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany
    • Institut für Hochfrequenztechnik, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Schleinitzstraße 22, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany.
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  • Martin Pfannmöller,

    1. CellNetworks, BioQuant, Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 267, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany
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  • Levin Dieterle,

    1. Institut für Hochfrequenztechnik, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Schleinitzstraße 22, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany
    2. InnovationLab GmbH, Speyererstraße 4, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany
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  • Katrin Schultheiß,

    1. Institut für Hochfrequenztechnik, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Schleinitzstraße 22, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany
    2. InnovationLab GmbH, Speyererstraße 4, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany
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  • Rasmus R. Schröder,

    1. CellNetworks, BioQuant, Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 267, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany
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  • Wolfgang Kowalsky,

    1. Institut für Hochfrequenztechnik, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Schleinitzstraße 22, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany
    2. InnovationLab GmbH, Speyererstraße 4, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany
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  • Michael Kröger

    1. Institut für Hochfrequenztechnik, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Schleinitzstraße 22, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany
    2. InnovationLab GmbH, Speyererstraße 4, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany
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Abstract

Nanostructures are important for a wide area of applications, but are very often difficult to fabricate. A novel and basic approach for controlled nanofilament growth in an organic/inorganic composite material is demonstrated. Thin films of MoO3-doped 4′-bis(N-carbazolyl)-1,1′-biphenyl are grown via vacuum sublimation and analyzed using advanced electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. Using electron spectroscopic imaging in the core-loss and low-loss regime, MoO3 agglomerations are identified for different doping concentrations. A 3D reconstruction of the thin film yielded by electron tomography reveals a filamentous structure of MoO3 within the organic matrix. These filaments are preferentially oriented along the growth direction and are only a few nanometers in diameter. Furthermore, control of the filament growth is possible by changing the substrate temperature because for composites grown on substrates cooled to 120 K MoO3 agglomeration cannot be detected.

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