Get access

Near-Infrared SERS Nanoprobes with Plasmonic Au/Ag Hollow-Shell Assemblies for In Vivo Multiplex Detection

Authors

  • Homan Kang,

    1. Nano Systems Institute and Interdisciplinary, Program in Nano-Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742, Republic of Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sinyoung Jeong,

    1. Department of Chemistry Education, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742, Republic of Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Younggeun Park,

    1. Department of Bioengineering, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Joonhyuk Yim,

    1. School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Bong-Hyun Jun,

    1. Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, Republic of Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • San Kyeong,

    1. School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jin-Kyoung Yang,

    1. School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Gunsung Kim,

    1. Department of Chemistry Education, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742, Republic of Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • SoonGweon Hong,

    1. Department of Bioengineering, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Luke P. Lee,

    1. Department of Bioengineering, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jong-Ho Kim,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan, 426-791, Republic of Korea
    • Department of Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan, 426-791, Republic of Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ho-Young Lee,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, 463-707, Republic of Korea
    • Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, 463-707, Republic of Korea.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dae Hong Jeong,

    Corresponding author
    1. Nano Systems Institute and Interdisciplinary, Program in Nano-Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742, Republic of Korea
    2. Department of Chemistry Education, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742, Republic of Korea
    • Nano Systems Institute and Interdisciplinary, Program in Nano-Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742, Republic of Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Yoon-Sik Lee

    Corresponding author
    1. Nano Systems Institute and Interdisciplinary, Program in Nano-Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742, Republic of Korea
    2. School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea
    • Nano Systems Institute and Interdisciplinary, Program in Nano-Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742, Republic of Korea
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

For the effective application of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoprobes for in vivo targeting, the tissue transparency of the probe signals should be as high as it can be in order to increase detection sensitivity and signal reproducibility. Here, near-infrared (NIR)-sensitive SERS nanoprobes (NIR SERS dots) are demonstrated for in vivo multiplex detection. The NIR SERS dots consist of plasmonic Au/Ag hollow-shell (HS) assemblies on the surface of silica nanospheres and simple aromatic Raman labels. The diameter of the HS interior is adjusted from 3 to 11 nm by varying the amount of Au3+ added, which results in a red-shift of the plasmonic extinction of the Au/Ag nanoparticles toward the NIR (700–900 nm). The red-shifted plasmonic extinction of NIR SERS dots causes enhanced SERS signals in the NIR optical window where endogenous tissue absorption coefficients are more than two orders of magnitude lower than those for ultraviolet and visible light. The signals from NIR SERS dots are detectable from 8-mm deep in animal tissues. Three kinds of NIR SERS dots, which are injected into live animal tissues, produce strong SERS signals from deep tissues without spectral overlap, demonstrating their potential for in vivo multiplex detection of specific target molecules.

Ancillary