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Rapid, One-Step, Digital Selective Growth of ZnO Nanowires on 3D Structures Using Laser Induced Hydrothermal Growth

Authors

  • Junyeob Yeo,

    1. Applied Nano Tech and Science (ANTS) Lab, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KI for the Nano Century, KI for the optical science and technology, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701, Korea
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  • Sukjoon Hong,

    1. Applied Nano Tech and Science (ANTS) Lab, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KI for the Nano Century, KI for the optical science and technology, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701, Korea
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  • Manorotkul Wanit,

    1. Applied Nano Tech and Science (ANTS) Lab, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KI for the Nano Century, KI for the optical science and technology, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701, Korea
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  • Hyun Wook Kang,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701, Korea
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  • Daeho Lee,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Laser Thermal Lab, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740, USA
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  • Costas P. Grigoropoulos,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Laser Thermal Lab, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740, USA
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  • Hyung Jin Sung,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701, Korea
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  • Seung Hwan Ko

    Corresponding author
    1. Applied Nano Tech and Science (ANTS) Lab, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KI for the Nano Century, KI for the optical science and technology, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701, Korea
    • Applied Nano Tech and Science (ANTS) Lab, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KI for the Nano Century, KI for the optical science and technology, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701, Korea.
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Abstract

For functional nanowire based electronics fabrication, conventionally, combination of complex multiple steps, such as (1) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of nanowire, (2) harvesting of nanowire, (3) manipulation and placement of individual nanowires, and (4) integration of nanowire to circuit are necessary. Each step is very time consuming, expensive, and environmentally unfriendly, and only a very low yield is achieved through the multiple steps. As an alternative to conventional complex multistep approach, original findings are presented on the first demonstration of rapid, one step, digital selective growth of nanowires directly on 3D micro/nanostructures by developing a novel approach; laser induced hydrothermal growth (LIHG) without any complex integration of series of multiple process steps such as using any conventional photolithography process or CVD. The LIHG process can grow nanowires by scanning a focused laser beam as a local heat source in a fully digital manner to grow nanowires on arbitrary patterns and even on the non-flat, 3D micro/nano structures in a safer liquid environment, as opposed to a gas environment. The LIHG process can greatly reduce the processing lead time and simplify the nanowire-based nanofabrication process by removing multiple steps for growth, harvest, manipulation/placement, and integration of the nanowires. LIHG process can grow nanowire directly on 3D micro/nano structures, which will be extremely challenging even for the conventional nanowire integration processes. LIHG does not need a vacuum environment to grow nanowires but can be performed in a solution environment which is safer and cheaper. LIHG can also be used for flexible substrates such as temperature-sensitive polymers due to the low processing temperature. Most of all, the LIHG process is a digital process that does not require conventional vacuum deposition or a photolithography mask.

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