Biomimetics: Controlling the Synaptic Plasticity of a Cu2S Gap-Type Atomic Switch (Adv. Funct. Mater. 17/2012)

Authors

  • Alpana Nayak,

    Corresponding author
    1. International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, (WPI-MANA) National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, 305-0044, Japan
    • International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, (WPI-MANA) National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, 305-0044, Japan.
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  • Takeo Ohno,

    1. International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, (WPI-MANA) National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, 305-0044, Japan
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  • Tohru Tsuruoka,

    1. International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, (WPI-MANA) National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, 305-0044, Japan
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  • Kazuya Terabe,

    1. International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, (WPI-MANA) National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, 305-0044, Japan
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  • Tsuyoshi Hasegawa,

    1. International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, (WPI-MANA) National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, 305-0044, Japan
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  • James K. Gimzewski,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, 607 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    2. California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI), University of California, Los Angeles, 570 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
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  • Masakazu Aono

    1. International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, (WPI-MANA) National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, 305-0044, Japan
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Abstract

original image

Representing a synapse, which is the basic unit of neural communication in the human brain, by a single device is a challenging task. On page 3606, Alpana Nayak and co-workers represent a synapse by a single solid-state electrochemical nanodevice called a Cu2S gap-type atomic switch. The switch exhibits the sensory, short- and long-term memories and shows the potential for perceiving two important environmental factors, namely air and temperature.

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