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Universality of Polarization Switching Dynamics in Ferroelectric Capacitors Revealed by 5D Piezoresponse Force Microscopy

Authors

  • Yunseok Kim,

    Corresponding author
    1. The Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA
    2. School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, Republic of Korea
    • The Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA.
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  • Xiaoli Lu,

    1. Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany
    2. State Key Discipline Laboratory of Wide Band Gap Semiconductor, Technology, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi'an 710071, China
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  • Stephen Jesse,

    1. The Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA
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  • Dietrich Hesse,

    1. Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany
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  • Marin Alexe,

    1. Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany
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  • Sergei V. Kalinin

    Corresponding author
    1. The Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA
    • The Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA.
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Abstract

Ferroelectric polarization switching is sensitively affected by phenomena on multiple length scales, giving rise to complex voltage- and time-controlled behaviors. Here, spatially resolved switching dynamics in ferroelectric nanocapacitors are explored as a function of voltage pulse time and magnitude. A remarkable persistence of formal macroscopic scaling laws for polarization switching based on classical models down to nanoscale volumes is observed. These observations illustrate the persistence of the return point memory in the material and allow the thermodynamic parameters of defects controlling switching to be estimated.

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