Dissolvable Metals for Transient Electronics

Authors

  • Lan Yin,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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  • Huanyu Cheng,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Center for Engineering and Health and Skin Disease Research Center, Evanston, Illinois, USA
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  • Shimin Mao,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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  • Richard Haasch,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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  • Yuhao Liu,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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  • Xu Xie,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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  • Suk-Won Hwang,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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  • Harshvardhan Jain,

    1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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  • Seung-Kyun Kang,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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  • Yewang Su,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Center for Engineering and Health and Skin Disease Research Center, Evanston, Illinois, USA
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  • Rui Li,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, China
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  • Yonggang Huang,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Center for Engineering and Health and Skin Disease Research Center, Evanston, Illinois, USA
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  • John A. Rogers

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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Abstract

Reactive dissolution and its effects on electrical conduction, morphological change and chemical transformation in thin films of Mg, AZ31B Mg alloy, Zn, Fe, W, and Mo in de-ionized (DI) water and simulated body fluids (Hanks’ solution pH 5–8) are systematically studied, to assess the potential for use of these metals in water-soluble, that is, physically "transient", electronics. The results indicate that the electrical dissolution rates in thin films can be much different that traditionally reported corrosion rates in corresponding bulk materials. Silicon metal oxide field effect transistors (MOSFETs) built with these metals demonstrate feasibility for use in transient electronics.

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