High-Rate Continuous Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Perovskites and Metal Oxides in a Colliding Vapor Stream of Microdroplets

Authors

  • Teyeb Ould-Ely,

    1. Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, USA
    2. California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, USA
    3. Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, USA
    4. Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, USA
    5. LifeCel Technology, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA, USA
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  • Lyle Kaplan-Reinig,

    1. LifeCel Technology, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA, USA
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  • Daniel E. Morse

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, USA
    2. California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, USA
    3. Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, USA
    4. Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, USA
    5. LifeCel Technology, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA, USA
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Abstract

A high-rate, continuous synthesis of functional nanomaterials using a home engineered reactor is reported. The reactor is able to produce low-cost, kilogram-scale BaTiO3 nanopowders with a nanocrystalline particle size less than 30 nm at mild temperatures (<100 °C) and ambient pressure. Nebulization and collision of warm microdroplets (60–80 °C) of Ba(OH)2 and Ti(O-nBu)4 very quickly result in total hydrolysis and subsequent conversion to BaTiO3, yielding 1.3 kg/day of high purity, highly crystalline nanoparticles (25–30 nm). This synthesis procedure also enables high-rate production of TiO2 anatase (2.9 kg/day). It therefore provides a general platform for processing and scaling up of functional inorganic nanomaterials under very mild conditions.

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