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Self-Assembled Platinum Nanochain Networks Driven by Induced Magnetic Dipoles

Authors

  • Min-Rui Gao,

    1. Division of Nanomaterials and Chemistry, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, P. R. China
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  • Shi-Ran Zhang,

    1. Division of Nanomaterials and Chemistry, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, P. R. China
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  • Yun-Fei Xu,

    1. Division of Nanomaterials and Chemistry, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, P. R. China
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  • Ya-Rong Zheng,

    1. Division of Nanomaterials and Chemistry, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, P. R. China
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  • Jun Jiang,

    1. Division of Nanomaterials and Chemistry, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, P. R. China
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  • Shu-Hong Yu

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Nanomaterials and Chemistry, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, P. R. China
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Abstract

Developing a reliable technique to organize nanoscale building blocks into ordered one-dimensional assemblies is of particular interest in a range of practical applications. Here, for the first time, it is reported that platinum (Pt) nanoparticle chain networks can be assembled spontaneously in solution on a large scale. The in-situ induced magnetic dipoles are believed to be the driving force for producing such elegant assembled nanochains. The alterant electronic structure of Pt modified by a very thin layer of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) molecules leads to the ferromagnetism of Pt (a traditional paramagnetic metal), which has been verified by a series of analysis techniques and theoretical modeling. The temperature- and time-dependent nucleation, growth, and organization processes of Pt chain networks are carefully investigated. These findings not only present the uncommon ferromagnetism of Pt, but also raise a possibility for expanding this strategy towards other assemblies of nonmagnetic nanoscale building blocks.

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