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Metabolizable Bi2Se3 Nanoplates: Biodistribution, Toxicity, and Uses for Cancer Radiation Therapy and Imaging

Authors

  • Xiao-Dong Zhang,

    1. Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, China
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  • Jie Chen,

    1. Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, China
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  • Yuho Min,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
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  • Gyeong Bae Park,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
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  • Xiu Shen,

    1. Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, China
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  • Sha-Sha Song,

    1. Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, China
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  • Yuan-Ming Sun,

    1. Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, China
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  • Hao Wang,

    1. Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, China
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  • Wei Long,

    1. Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, China
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  • Jianping Xie,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore
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  • Kai Gao,

    1. Key Laboratory of Human Disease Comparative Medicine, Ministry of Health, Institute of Laboratory Animal Science, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Comparative Medical Center, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China
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  • Lianfeng Zhang,

    1. Key Laboratory of Human Disease Comparative Medicine, Ministry of Health, Institute of Laboratory Animal Science, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Comparative Medical Center, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China
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  • Saijun Fan,

    1. Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, China
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  • Feiyue Fan,

    1. Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, China
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  • Unyong Jeong

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
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Abstract

Bi, a high atomic number element, has a high photoelectric absorption coefficient, and Se has anticancer activity. Hence, their compound chalcogenide (Bi2Se3) deserves a thorough investigation for biomedical applications. This study reveals that Bi2Se3 nanoplates (54 nm wide) protected with poly(vinylpyrollidone) (PVP) could be presumed to have low toxicity even at a high dose of 20 mg/kg in mice. This conclusion is made through studies on the biodistribution and 90-day long term in vivo clearance of the nanoplates. The liver and spleen are dominant organs for accumulation of the nanoplates, which is mainly due to RES absorption. 93% of the nanoplates are cleared after 90 days of treatment. Concentrations of Bi and Se in tumor tissue continuously increased until 72 h after intraperitoneal injection into mice. Such selective accumulation of Bi is utilized to enhance the contrast of X-ray computerized tomography (CT) images. Bi element concentrated in a tumor leads to damage on the tumor cells when exposed to gamma radiation. Growth of the tumor is significantly delayed and stopped in 16 days after the tumor is treated by radiation with Bi2Se3 nanoplates. This work clearly shows that Bi2Se3 nanoplates may be used for cancer radiation therapy and CT imaging. The nanoplates deserve further study for biological and medical applications.

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