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Composite Living Fibers for Creating Tissue Constructs Using Textile Techniques

Authors

  • Mohsen Akbari,

    1. McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, McGill University, Quebec, Montreal, Canada
    2. Biomedical Engineering Department, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    3. Center for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Womenís HospitalHarvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    4. Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
    5. Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA
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  • Ali Tamayol,

    1. McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, McGill University, Quebec, Montreal, Canada
    2. Biomedical Engineering Department, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    3. Center for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Womenís HospitalHarvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    4. Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
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  • Veronique Laforte,

    1. McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, McGill University, Quebec, Montreal, Canada
    2. Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Nasim Annabi,

    1. Center for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Womenís HospitalHarvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    2. Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
    3. Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA
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  • Alireza Hassani Najafabadi,

    1. Center for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Womenís HospitalHarvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    2. Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
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  • Ali Khademhosseini,

    Corresponding author
    1. Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
    2. Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA
    3. Department of Physics, King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia
    4. Department of Maxillofacial Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • David Juncker

    Corresponding author
    1. McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, McGill University, Quebec, Montreal, Canada
    2. Biomedical Engineering Department, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    3. Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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Abstract

The fabrication of cell-laden structures with anisotropic mechanical properties while having a precise control over the distribution of different cell types within the constructs is important for many tissue engineering applications. Automated textile technologies for making fabrics allow simultaneous control over the color pattern and directional mechanical properties. The use of textile techniques in tissue engineering, however, demands the presence of cell-laden fibers that can withstand the mechanical stresses during the assembly process. Here, the concept of composite living fibers (CLFs) in which a core of load bearing synthetic polymer is coated by a hydrogel layer containing cells or microparticles is introduced. The core thread is drawn sequentially through reservoirs containing a cell-laden prepolymer and a crosslinking reagent. The thickness of the hydrogel layer increases linearly with to the drawing speed and the prepolymer viscosity. CLFs are fabricated and assembled using regular textile processes including weaving, knitting, braiding, winding, and embroidering, to form cell-laden structures. Cellular viability and metabolic activity are preserved during CLF fabrication and assembly, demonstrating the feasibility of using these processes for engineering functional 3D tissue constructs.

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