Advanced Functional Materials

Cover image for Vol. 16 Issue 18

December, 2006

Volume 16, Issue 18

Pages 2301–2478

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    7. Annual Index
    1. Cover Picture: Bilayer Organic–Inorganic Gate Dielectrics for High-Performance, Low-Voltage, Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistors, Complementary Logic Gates, and p–n Diodes on Plastic Substrates (Adv. Funct. Mater. 18/2006)

      Q. Cao, M.-G. Xia, M. Shim and J. A. Rogers

      Article first published online: 5 DEC 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200690065

      High-capacitance bilayer nanodielectrics based on atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 and spin-cast ultrathin epoxy (see figure and cover) are developed for integration with networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes to enable low-voltage, hysteresis-free, and high-performance thin-film transistors on silicon and flexible plastic substrates.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    7. Annual Index
    1. Inside Front Cover: Self-Assembly of Diblock-Copolymer Micelles for Template-Based Preparation of PbTiO3 Nanograins (Adv. Funct. Mater. 18/2006)

      S. Kronholz, S. Rathgeber, S. Karthäuser, H. Kohlstedt, S. Clemens and T. Schneller

      Article first published online: 5 DEC 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200690066

      A bottom-up fabrication route for PbTiO3 nanograins is presented (see figure and inside cover). The method is based on using predefined TiO2 nanostructures 12 nm in size. The dimensions of the nanostructures can be transferred from the self-organized micellar monofilm, which is used as an etching template, through all processing steps to the final PbTiO3 nanograins.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    7. Annual Index
    1. Contents: Adv. Funct. Mater. 18/2006 (pages 2301–2308)

      Article first published online: 5 DEC 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200690061

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    7. Annual Index
    1. Self-Assembly of a Micelle Structure from Graft and Diblock Copolymers: An Example of Overcoming the Limitations of Polyions in Drug Delivery (pages 2309–2316)

      C.-L. Lo, K.-M. Lin, C.-K. Huang and G.-H. Hsiue

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200500627

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel mixed micelle is successfully prepared from a graft copolymer and two diblock copolymers (see figure). This nanostructure is capable of screening the highly negative charges of the graft copolymer and exhibits multifunctionality, making it suitable for applications in drug delivery.

    2. Aggregation-Enhanced Fluorescence and Two-Photon Absorption in Nanoaggregates of a 9,10-Bis[4′-(4″-aminostyryl)styryl]anthracene Derivative (pages 2317–2323)

      S. Kim, Q. Zheng, G. S. He, D. J. Bharali, H. E. Pudavar, A. Baev and P. N. Prasad

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200500928

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A severely distorted 9,10-bis[4'-(4''-aminostyryl)styryl]anthracene derivative (see figure) exhibits enhanced two-photon absorption and subsequently generates strong up-converted fluorescence upon nanoaggregation because of the planarization of π-conjugation and the reduced intermolecular interaction by loose stacking.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Synthesis of Hexagonal-Phase NaYF4:Yb,Er and NaYF4:Yb,Tm Nanocrystals with Efficient Up-Conversion Fluorescence (pages 2324–2329)

      G. S. Yi and G. M. Chow

      Article first published online: 27 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200600053

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      IR-to-visible up-conversion fluorescent nanocrystals of hexagonal-phase NaYF4:20%Yb,2%Er and NaYF4:20%Yb,2%Tm have been synthesized. They form a transparent colloidal solution and produce intense green (NaYF4:20%Yb,2%Er) and blue (NaYF4:20%Yb,2%Tm) up-conversion fluorescence (see figure) under 980 nm near-IR excitation. They have potential applications in optical nanodevices and bioprobes.

    4. Design of Gold Nanoparticles for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (pages 2330–2339)

      P.-J. Debouttière, S. Roux, F. Vocanson, C. Billotey, O. Beuf, A. Favre-Réguillon, Y. Lin, S. Pellet-Rostaing, R. Lamartine, P. Perriat and O. Tillement

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200600242

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent has been developed based on gadolinium chelates immobilized on gold nanoparticles. As shown in the figure, the robust multilayered ligand shell formed around the gold particles is able to bind many gadolinium ions, thereby yielding much greater contrast per contrast agent as compared to free gadolinium chelates.

    5. Amphiphilic Poly(p-phenylene)s for Self-Organized Porous Blue-Light-Emitting Thin Films (pages 2340–2345)

      M. H. Nurmawati, R. Renu, P. K. Ajikumar, S. Sindhu, F. C. Cheong, C. H. Sow and S. Valiyaveettil

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200600362

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microstructuring of conjugated polymers into honeycomb patterns (see figure) by a single-step self-organization of functionalized poly(p-phenylene)s is reported. The importance of polymer structure in the preparation of self-organized, highly periodic, microstructured, fluorescent, honeycomb films is demonstrated. The light-emitting properties of these high-surface-area films with periodical patterns make them particularly interesting.

    6. Self-Assembly of Diblock-Copolymer Micelles for Template-Based Preparation of PbTiO3 Nanograins (pages 2346–2354)

      S. Kronholz, S. Rathgeber, S. Karthäuser, H. Kohlstedt, S. Clemens and T. Schneller

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200600384

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A bottom-up fabrication route for PbTiO3 nanograins is presented (see figure and inside cover). The method is based on using predefined TiO2 nanostructures 12 nm in size. The dimensions of the nanostructures can be transferred from the self-organized micellar monofilm, which is used as an etching template, through all processing steps to the final PbTiO3 nanograins.

    7. Bilayer Organic–Inorganic Gate Dielectrics for High-Performance, Low-Voltage, Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistors, Complementary Logic Gates, and p–n Diodes on Plastic Substrates (pages 2355–2362)

      Q. Cao, M.-G. Xia, M. Shim and J. A. Rogers

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200600539

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-capacitance bilayer nanodielectrics based on atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 and spin-cast ultrathin epoxy (see figure and cover) are developed for integration with networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes to enable low-voltage, hysteresis-free, and high-performance thin-film transistors on silicon and flexible plastic substrates.

    8. Nanoscale Effects on the Ionic Conductivity of Highly Doped Bulk Nanometric Cerium Oxide (pages 2363–2368)

      U. Anselmi-Tamburini, F. Maglia, G. Chiodelli, A. Tacca, G. Spinolo, P. Riello, S. Bucella and Z. A. Munir

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200500415

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dense (> 99%) samaria-doped cerium oxide show a conductivity dependence on grain size, as measured by AC impedance spectroscopy. With a grain size less than 20 nm, only one semicircle pertaining to bulk conductivity is observed, as indicated in the figure. The absence of the grain-boundary blocking effect has been reported before, but not in bulk materials with pure ionic conductivity. The observations are explained in terms of a space-charge model.

    9. Modifying the Output Characteristics of an Organic Light-Emitting Device by Refractive-Index Modulation (pages 2369–2373)

      T. Höfler, M. Weinberger, W. Kern, S. Rentenberger and A. Pogantsch

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200500503

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A photoreactive hole-transporting material is presented that can be index patterned by UV interference lithography. The material is a copolymer of N-vinylcarbazole and the photoreactive monomer 4-vinylbenzyl thiocyanate. The outcoupling behavior of organic light-emitting devices becomes more forward-directed when a line pattern is inscribed in the active layer of the device (see figure).

    10. Fabrication of Metal Oxides Occluded in Ordered Mesoporous Hosts via a Solid-State Grinding Route: The Influence of Host–Guest Interactions (pages 2374–2386)

      Y. M. Wang, Z. Y. Wu, H. J. Wang and J. H. Zhu

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200500613

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      There is a fine line between too much host–guest interaction and too little. Guest species can be introduced into mesoporous materials by solid-state grinding (see figure) thanks to the interactions between the host and guest molecules. Host–guest interactions that are too strong disturb the nanocasting, whilst a lack of these interactions inhibits the good dispersion of the guest species.

    11. α,ω-Dithiol Oligo(phenylene vinylene)s for the Preparation of High-Quality π-Conjugated Self-Assembled Monolayers and Nanoparticle- Functionalized Electrodes (pages 2387–2392)

      D. S. Seferos, R. Y. Lai, K. W. Plaxco and G. C. Bazan

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200500902

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      π-Conjugated molecules with α,ω-dithiols can be easily prepared. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) can be built on a gold electrode with external thiols that bind to additional surfaces. Ferrocene-modified CdSe nanocrystals were used to evaluate the electrochemical response in metal– molecule–semiconductor (CdSe) assemblies.

    12. Fabrication of Electrospinning-Derived Carbon Nanofiber Webs for the Anode Material of Lithium-Ion Secondary Batteries (pages 2393–2397)

      C. Kim, K. S. Yang, M. Kojima, K. Yoshida, Y. J. Kim, Y. A. Kim and M. Endo

      Article first published online: 27 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200500911

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-purity carbon nanofiber webs are fabricated using an electrospinning technique and thermal treatment (see figure). This fibrous carbon possesses properties (e.g., large accessible surface area, good electrical conductivity, high reversible capacity ca. 450 mA h g–1) that make it a potentially excellent candidate for use as the anode material in high-power lithium-ion batteries, owing to the highly reduced lithium-ion diffusion path within the active material.

    13. Template Growth of Nanocrystalline PbS, CdS, and ZnS on a Polydiacetylene Langmuir Film: An In Situ Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction Study (pages 2398–2404)

      Y. Lifshitz, O. Konovalov, N. Belman, A. Berman and Y. Golan

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200600020

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The influence of polydiacetylene (PDA) Langmuir films on the nucleation and growth of PbS, CdS, and ZnS nanocrystals at the air/solution interface is investigated in situ using synchrotron grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (see figure). The robust, polyconjugated organic film template plays a dominant role in determining the morphology and orientation of the deposited material.

    14. Linear and Nonlinear Optical Properties of Ag Nanowire Polarizing Glass (pages 2405–2408)

      Q.-Q. Wang, J.-B. Han, H.-M. Gong, D.-J. Chen, X.-J. Zhao, J.-Y. Feng and J.-J. Ren

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200600096

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A polarizing glass containing Ag nanorods is prepared by thermal elongation–reduction. When the polarization of a laser (780 nm) is perpendicular to the long axis of the Ag nanorods, the one- and two-photon figures of merit (FOM; see figure) satisfy the necessary requirements that W > 1 and T < 1 for applications in all-optical switching.

    15. High-Resolution Characterization of Pentacene/Polyaniline Interfaces in Thin-Film Transistors (pages 2409–2414)

      K. S. Lee, T. J. Smith, K. C. Dickey, J. E. Yoo, K. J. Stevenson and Y.-L. Loo

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200600170

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Differences in grain continuity and molecular orientation across the electrode/channel interface in bottom-contact pentacene thin-film transistors with gold electrodes leads to large contact resistance. Such morphological and structural differences are not observed in analogous transistors with polyaniline (PANI) electrodes (see figure; PAAMPSA is the polymer acid used), which exhibit negligible contact resistance.

    16. Co-synthesis of ZnO–CuO Nanostructures by Directly Heating Brass in Air (pages 2415–2422)

      Y. Zhu, C.-H. Sow, T. Yu, Q. Zhao, P. Li, Z. Shen, D. Yu and J. T.-L. Thong

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200600251

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      ZnO–CuO nanostructures are co-synthesized by simply heating a CuZn alloy (brass) on a hotplate under ambient conditions. ZnO products can be 1D nanowires, 2D nanosheets, or 3D nanoscaffolds (see figure), in coexistence with CuO nanowires. This method provides a route to the simultaneous fabrication of nanostructures with different functions on the same substrate.

    17. Low Electrical Percolation Threshold of Silver and Copper Nanowires in Polystyrene Composites (pages 2423–2430)

      G. A. Gelves, B. Lin, U. Sundararaj and J. A. Haber

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200600336

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-aspect-ratio Ag and Cu nanowires (NWs) have been synthesized in gram quantities by AC electrodeposition in porous alumina templates and subsequent liberation. The electrical percolation of the NWs in polystyrene (PS) matrices has been obtained at low metal concentrations (see graph). The results indicate that conductive metal/polymer nanocomposites may be an alternative to carbon-nanotube nanocomposites for electrical applications.

    18. Efficient Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube–Nanoparticle Hybrids (pages 2431–2437)

      X. L. Li, Y. Q. Liu, L. Fu, L. C. Cao, D. C. Wei and Y. Wang

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200600339

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An efficient and versatile strategy for synthesizing carbon nanotube–nanoparticle heterostructures is reported here. As shown in the figure, this strategy involves the nondestructive, noncovalent functionalization of the nanotube sidewalls with a bifunctional molecule, followed by the in situ growth of inorganic nanoparticles on the sidewalls, demonstrated here for Pt, CdS, and silica nanoparticles.

    19. Platinum Binuclear Complexes as Phosphorescent Dopants for Monochromatic and White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (pages 2438–2446)

      B. Ma, P. I. Djurovich, S. Garon, B. Alleyne and M. E. Thompson

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200600614

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) emitting monochromatic and white light have been fabricated using binuclear Pt complexes as phosphorescent dopants. The color of electroluminescence (see figure) and current-density–voltage characteristics of the devices are determined solely by the Pt–Pt separation in the complexes. White OLEDs are fabricated using compounds 1 and 3 in three different device architectures.

  5. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    7. Annual Index
  6. Annual Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    7. Annual Index
    1. Author Index Adv. Funct. Mater. 2006, Vol. 16 (pages 2449–2456)

      Article first published online: 5 DEC 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200690063

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