Advanced Functional Materials

Cover image for Vol. 18 Issue 23

Special Issue: International Conference on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology 2008

December 8, 2008

Volume 18, Issue 23

Pages 3735–3858

Issue edited by: Paul Mulvaney

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
    1. Cover Picture: Spinning Carbon Nanotube-Gel Fibers Using Polyelectrolyte Complexation (Adv. Funct. Mater. 23/2008)

      Alberto J. Granero, Joselito M. Razal, Gordon G. Wallace and Marc in het Panhuis

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200890097

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The use of wet-spinning and polyelectrolyte complexation to assemble carbon nanotube-gel fibers by injecting a SWNT-biopolymer dispersion into a coagulation bath containing a biopolymer of opposite charge is described by A. J. Granero on page 3759. The ability to spin fibers, and their properties, depend on processing conditions such as polyelectrolyte pH, sonolysis regime, and the order in which the anionic and cationic biopolymer solutions are added.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
    1. Inside Front Cover: Designed Fabrication of Silica-Based Nanostructured Particle Systems for Nanomedicine Applications (Adv. Funct. Mater. 23/2008)

      Yuanzhe Piao, Andrew Burns, Jaeyun Kim, Ulrich Wiesner and Taeghwan Hyeon

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200890098

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      Silica provides an excellent host material for the integration of a wide variety of nanomaterials into uniform, multifunctional silica nanoparticle systems with specific combinations of properties for biomedical applications. On page 3745, the Feature Article by Piao et al. surveys recent research on nanoparticle-system fabrication strategies as well as their applications to medical diagnostics and therapy, paving the way for the emerging field of nanomedicine.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
    1. Contents: (Adv. Funct. Mater. 23/2008) (pages 3735–3741)

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200890099

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Frontiers in Nanomaterials (pages 3743–3744)

      Paul Mulvaney

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200801572

  5. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
    1. Designed Fabrication of Silica-Based Nanostructured Particle Systems for Nanomedicine Applications (pages 3745–3758)

      Yuanzhe Piao, Andrew Burns, Jaeyun Kim, Ulrich Wiesner and Taeghwan Hyeon

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800731

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Silica-based nanostructured particle systems have been designed and fabricated by integrating diverse nanomaterials with monodispersed silica nanoparticles using different chemistries and techniques. Research into these particle systems for biomedical applications has progressed rapidly during recent years. Major recent research progress on the fabrication strategies of these nanoparticle systems and their applications to medical diagnostics and therapy are presented.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
    1. Spinning Carbon Nanotube-Gel Fibers Using Polyelectrolyte Complexation (pages 3759–3764)

      Alberto J. Granero, Joselito M. Razal, Gordon G. Wallace and Marc in het Panhuis

      Article first published online: 29 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800847

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Carbon nanotube-gel fibers (see figure) have been prepared by combining polyelectrolyte complexation of two oppositely charged biopolymers with continuous flow spinning. The ability to spin fibers and their properties depend on processing conditions such as polyelectrolyte pH, sonolysis regime, and order of addition.

    2. Interaction Between Human Osteoblast Cells and Inorganic Two-Dimensional Scaffolds Based on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes: A Quantitative AFM Study (pages 3765–3771)

      Izabela Firkowska, Eva Godehardt and Michael Giersig

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800760

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      A novel, highly ordered MWCNT-based matrix, engineered with biologically important nanoscaled topography is explored as a scaffold for osteoblast cell growth. The exceptional nanotopography of the matrices provides enhanced cell adhesion, which is confirmed by scanning electron microscopy observation and atomic force microscopy nanomechanical analysis.

    3. Sol–Gel Based Vertical Optical Microcavities with Quantum Dot Defect Layers (pages 3772–3779)

      Jacek Jasieniak, Cinzia Sada, Alessandro Chiasera, Maurizio Ferrari, Alessandro Martucci and Paul Mulvaney

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800784

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      The interaction between semiconductor quantum dot emitters (QDs) and sol–gel based asymmetric Bragg microcavities is studied. Interlayer diffusion is found to limit the maximum achievable Q-factor of the microcavity to values <100, however, such structures still cause large modifications to the photoluminescence properties of QD emitters located within the defect layers.

    4. Influence of Iodide Ions on the Growth of Gold Nanorods: Tuning Tip Curvature and Surface Plasmon Resonance (pages 3780–3786)

      Marek Grzelczak, Ana Sánchez-Iglesias, Benito Rodríguez-González, Ramón Alvarez-Puebla, Jorge Pérez-Juste and Luis M. Liz-Marzán

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800706

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Morphological and optical changes can be induced by seed-mediated growth of gold nanorods in the presence of iodide ions. Dumbbell-like nanoparticles are obtained through addition of small amounts of iodide to the growth solution, meaning that gold salt reduction takes place preferentially at the rod tips, strongly affecting the optical response.

    5. Aligned Titania Nanotubes as an Intercalation Anode Material for Hybrid Electrochemical Energy Storage (pages 3787–3793)

      Da-Wei Wang, Hai-Tao Fang, Feng Li, Zhi-Gang Chen, Qi-Sheng Zhong, Gao Qing Lu and Hui-Ming Cheng

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800635

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      Aligned titania nanotube anodes and ordered mesoporous carbon cathodes result in high energy/power density in hybrid electrochemical cells. The cells' superior performance is attributed to enhanced ionic transport kinetics and uptake, and has relevance for future energy storage applications.

    6. High Purity GaAs Nanowires Free of Planar Defects: Growth and Characterization (pages 3794–3800)

      Hannah J. Joyce, Qiang Gao, H. Hoe Tan, Chennupati Jagadish, Yong Kim, Melodie A. Fickenscher, Saranga Perera, Thang Ba Hoang, Leigh M. Smith, Howard E. Jackson, Jan M. Yarrison-Rice, Xin Zhang and Jin Zou

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800625

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      Eliminating structural defects, crystallographic defects and intrinsic dopants in nanowire “nano-components” is critical for development of nanowire-based devices. High purity, uniformly aligned epitaxial GaAs nanowires free of planar crystallographic defects and with excellent optical properties are demonstrated. The figure shows SEM and TEM images and the photoluminescence spectrum of these excellent nanowires.

    7. The Effect of Stabilizer Density on Transformation of CdTe Nanoparticles Induced by Ag Cations (pages 3801–3808)

      Zhiyong Tang, Paul Podsiadlo, Bong Sup Shim, Jungwoo Lee and Nicholas A. Kotov

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800691

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      The surface density of stabilizers determines the growth mode and morphology of the transformation products of CdTe nanoparticles induced by Ag cations. CdTe nanoparticles with a low surface density of stabilizers are transformed into Ag2Te nanowire networks, whereas spherical Ag2Te nanoparticles are formed for CdTe nanoparticles with a high surface density of stabilizers.

    8. Vibrational Dynamics of Silver Nanocubes and Nanowires Studied by Single-Particle Transient Absorption Spectroscopy (pages 3809–3817)

      Hristina Staleva and Gregory V. Hartland

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800605

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      Transient absorption spectroscopy is used to study single silver nanocubes and nanowires. The figure shows an example image and transient absorption trace for a nanowire. The main feature in the trace is the coherently excited breathing mode. Analysis of the data yields the dephasing time of the vibrational motion, which is shown to be sensitive to the environment of the particles.

    9. Exposing the Molecular Sieving Architecture of Amorphous Silica Using Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (pages 3818–3826)

      Mikel C. Duke, Steven J. Pas, Anita J. Hill, Y. S. Lin and João C. Diniz da Costa

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800624

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hierarchical trimodal pore architecture is measured in amorphous silica by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy to give pores of 3, 8, and 12 Å. Each pore size domain can be related to the silica network formation and assembly of colloids. Small pores provide the small-molecule sieving function, while intermediate and large pores participate in total flux.

    10. Modifying Porous Silicon with Self-Assembled Monolayers for Biomedical Applications: The Influence of Surface Coverage on Stability and Biomolecule Coupling (pages 3827–3833)

      Till Böcking, Kristopher A. Kilian, Katharina Gaus and J. Justin Gooding

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800640

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mesoporous silicon photonic crystals display a reflectivity peak that is sensitive to chemical and biological modification (see figure). The surface coverage of monolayers formed inside the pores by hydrosilylation of alkenes can be engineered to tune both the stability in aqueous solutions as well as the reactivity towards biomolecules to suit the application.

    11. Hydrophobic Functional Group Initiated Helical Mesostructured Silica for Controlled Drug Release (pages 3834–3842)

      Lei Zhang, Shizhang Qiao, Yonggang Jin, Lina Cheng, Zifeng Yan and Gao Qing Lu

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800631

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Functionalized periodic helical mesostructured silicas with various functional organic groups and controlled morphologies are successfully synthesized by the one-step co-condensation of tetraethoxysilane and organoalkoxysilanes with hydrophobic groups using achiral surfactants as templates. The hydrophobic interaction between hydrophobic functional groups and the surfactant as well as the intercalation of hydrophobic groups into the micelles are proposed to lead to the formation of helical mesostructures.

    12. Gold Nanoparticle-Doped TiO2 Semiconductor Thin Films: Gas Sensing Properties (pages 3843–3849)

      Dario Buso, Michael Post, Carlo Cantalini, Paul Mulvaney and 2Alessandro Martucci

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800864

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      TiO2 sol–gel films doped with Au nanoparticles exhibit both optical and conductometric gas sensing capabilities. Conductometric gas sensors show very good response to H2 with an almost ideal kinetic response for the absorption and desorption steps. Better understanding of the mechanisms involved in sensing H2 and CO gases is achieved.

    13. Nucleation and Growth Mechanism of NixPt1–x Nanoparticles (pages 3850–3856)

      Kirsten Ahrenstorf, Hauke Heller, Andreas Kornowski, Jose A. C. Broekaert and Horst Weller

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800642

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The formation of monodisperse nanoparticles with high monodispersity and tuneable particle size is difficult because there is a lack of understanding regarding the nucleation and growth mechanism. Here, investigations into the formation of NixPt1–x nanoparticles and their size control are presented. Continuous injection of molecular precursors in the reaction solution is a new possibility to vary the particle size.

  7. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index

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