Advanced Functional Materials

Cover image for Vol. 19 Issue 9

May 8, 2009

Volume 19, Issue 9

Pages 1311–1466

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Full Papers
    8. Correction
    9. Index
    1. DNA Detection: Intercalating Dye Harnessed Cationic Conjugated Polymer for Real-Time Naked-Eye Recognition of Double-Stranded DNA in Serum (Adv. Funct. Mater. 9/2009)

      Kan-Yi Pu and Bin Liu

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200990032

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On page 1371, Liu Bin and Pu Kan-Yi demonstrate multicolor detection of double-stranded DNA in biological media using an intercalating-dye-harnessed cationic conjugated polymer. As demonstrated in the cover image, the intercalating-dye-harnessed polymer emits blue fluorescence both in the absence and presence of single-stranded DNA in serum-containing solution, while its fluorescence gradually turns from blue to dark yellow with increasing double-stranded DNA concentration.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Full Papers
    8. Correction
    9. Index
    1. Self-Healing Chemistry: Delivery of Two-Part Self-Healing Chemistry via Microvascular Networks (Adv. Funct. Mater. 9/2009)

      Kathleen S. Toohey, Christopher J. Hansen, Jennifer A. Lewis, Scott R. White and Nancy R. Sottos

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200990033

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microvascular self-healing of a brittle coating is accomplished by supplying fluid healing agents from an underlying network of microchannels. Dual independent networks filled with a two-part healing chemistry (epoxy resin and curing agent) that repeatedly heal damage in the coating up to 16 consecutive times are reported by K. S. Toohey et al. on page 1399.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Full Papers
    8. Correction
    9. Index
    1. Contents: (Adv. Funct. Mater. 9/2009) (pages 1311–1317)

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200990034

  4. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Full Papers
    8. Correction
    9. Index
    1. Triplet Harvesting in Hybrid White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (pages 1319–1333)

      Gregor Schwartz, Sebastian Reineke, Thomas Conrad Rosenow, Karsten Walzer and Karl Leo

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200801503

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      White organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are efficient large-area light sources on the way to becoming a major competitor in ambient lighting applications. A particularly elegant way to reach maximum efficiency in white OLEDs is to use only two phosphors (red and green emitting) in combination with one fluorophor (blue emitting) which has a small singlet–triplet splitting. 100% internal quantum efficiency can be achieved through proper choice of materials and sophisticated device stacks.

  5. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Full Papers
    8. Correction
    9. Index
    1. Conducting Polymers: An Optically Active Polythiophene Exhibiting Electrochemically Driven Light-Interference Modulation (Adv. Funct. Mater. 9/2009)

      Hiromasa Goto

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200990035

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This frontispiece shows a polarizing optical microscopy image of optically active polythiophene (PT) prepared in cholesteric liquid-crystal electrolyte solution containing a cholesterol derivative. The PT film exhibits a variable diffraction function, electrochemically driven refractive index modulation, and electrochromism originating from the periodic dielectric structure, representing a form of structural electrochromism, as described on page 1335.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Full Papers
    8. Correction
    9. Index
    1. An Optically Active Polythiophene Exhibiting Electrochemically Driven Light-Interference Modulation (pages 1335–1342)

      Hiromasa Goto

      Article first published online: 26 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200801782

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Optically active polythiophene (PT*) is prepared by electrochemical polymerization using a cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) electrolyte solution. The PT* film produced by the asymmetric polymerization in CLC exhibits a variable diffraction function, electrochemically driven refractive index modulation, and electrochromism originating from the periodic dielectric structure, representing a form of structural electrochromism.

    2. Plastic Dissipation Mechanisms in Periodic Microframe-Structured Polymers (pages 1343–1350)

      Lifeng Wang, Mary C. Boyce, Cheng-Yen Wen and Edwin L. Thomas

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200801483

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The plastic dissipation and mechanical response of polymeric microframe structures are investigated using micromechanical modeling of large deformations. Finite element analysis reveals the role of microstructural features in enabling a plasticity spreading mechanism during macroscopic loading, the development of a negative normal stress during simple shear, as well as optimally structuring the material to achieve desired mechanical performance.

    3. The Implications of Polymer Selection in Regenerative Medicine: A Comparison of Amorphous and Semi-Crystalline Polymer for Tissue Regeneration (pages 1351–1359)

      Michelle D. Kofron, Allison Griswold, Sangamesh G. Kumbar, Kylie Martin, Xuejun Wen and Cato T. Laurencin

      Article first published online: 9 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200801327

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Amorphous over semi-crystalline poly-(lactide-co-glycolide) material is advocated for applications in regenerative medicine. Quantitative microCT measurements following scaffold implantation demonstrate amorphous poly(lactide-co-glycolide) tubular scaffolds guide bone regeneration and support more mineralized tissue formation through the implant as compared to semi-crystalline poly(lactide-co-glycolide) tubular scaffolds.

    4. Integration of a Rib Waveguide Distributed Feedback Structure into a Light-Emitting Polymer Field-Effect Transistor (pages 1360–1370)

      Michael C. Gwinner, Saghar Khodabakhsh, Myoung Hoon Song, Heinz Schweizer, Harald Giessen and Henning Sirringhaus

      Article first published online: 9 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200801897

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Organic semiconductor lasers: An ambipolar light-emitting field-effect transistor based on a polyfluorene (F8BT) is integrated with a rib waveguide distributed feedback structure (see figure) based on Ta2O5. Due to the high refractive index of Ta2O5 the waveguide mode, into which the emitted light couples, is confined sufficiently to eliminate electrode absorption losses. Optical pumping yields low lasing thresholds of 4.5 μJ cm−2.

    5. Intercalating Dye Harnessed Cationic Conjugated Polymer for Real-Time Naked-Eye Recognition of Double-Stranded DNA in Serum (pages 1371–1378)

      Kan-Yi Pu and Bin Liu

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200801653

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Intercalating dye harnessed cationic conjugated polymers can be utilized as macromolecular fluorescent probes for naked-eye recognition of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in serum solution (see figure), which benefits from the specific binding between the intercalating dye and dsDNA and the in situ fluorescence resonance energy transfer from the light-harvesting conjugated backbone to the signaling TO side chain.

    6. Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy on Bulk Heterojunction Polymer Blends (pages 1379–1386)

      Klára Maturová, Martijn Kemerink, Martijn M. Wienk, Dimitri S. H. Charrier and René A. J. Janssen

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200801283

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Organic solar cells consisting of MDMO-PPV:PCBM are examined by scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. A 2D numerical model is used to quantitatively explain the observations. It is shown that the reduced performance of this solar cell is at least partially due to problematic electron transport. The band structure in the active layer is determined in dark and under operational conditions.

    7. Synthesis of Monodisperse Ag[BOND]Au Alloy Nanoparticles with Independently Tunable Morphology, Composition, Size, and Surface Chemistry and Their 3-D Superlattices (pages 1387–1398)

      Qingbo Zhang, Jianping Xie, Jing Liang and Jim Yang Lee

      Article first published online: 1 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200801476

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly monodisperse Ag–Au alloy nanoparticles with independently tunable morphology, composition, size, and surface chemistry are synthesized by a solution chemistry method. The as-synthesized alloy nanoparticles can form 3D superlattices with long-range order on solid substrates by self-assembly because of their size and shape monodispersity.

    8. Delivery of Two-Part Self-Healing Chemistry via Microvascular Networks (pages 1399–1405)

      Kathleen S. Toohey, Christopher J. Hansen, Jennifer A. Lewis, Scott R. White and Nancy R. Sottos

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200801824

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Multiple self-healing networks supply a two-part epoxy healing chemistry to cracks in a coating (see left of figure). The healing components react in the crack plane to repeatedly heal damage to the same location. After many healing cycles a significant amount of healed material builds up in the crack plane (see right of figure; scale bar = 20 mm).

    9. Biodegradable Dextran Nanogels for RNA Interference: Focusing on Endosomal Escape and Intracellular siRNA Delivery (pages 1406–1415)

      Koen Raemdonck, Broes Naeye, Kevin Buyens, Roosmarijn E. Vandenbroucke, Anders Høgset, Joseph Demeester and Stefaan C. De Smedt

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200801795

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biodegradable dextran nanogels are able to deliver siRNA to the cell cytoplasm in a degradation controlled manner. This manuscript proves that endosomal escape through nanogel degradation is a prerequisite to obtain substantial gene silencing.

    10. pH-Responsive Flower-Type Micelles Formed by a Biotinylated Poly(2-vinylpyridine)-block-poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) Triblock Copolymer (pages 1416–1425)

      Kathy Van Butsele, Sébastien Cajot, Sandra Van Vlierberghe, Peter Dubruel, Catherine Passirani, Jean-Pierre Benoit, Robert Jérôme and Christine Jérôme

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200801117

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Flower-like micelles that can expose a targeting unit at their periphery upon a decrease in pH are described. These micelles are composed of a novel biotinylated triblock copolymer of poly(ε-caprolactone)-block-poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PCL-b-PEO-b-P2VP).

    11. Bifurcated Mechanical Behavior of Deformed Periodic Porous Solids (pages 1426–1436)

      Srikanth Singamaneni, Katia Bertoldi, Sehoon Chang, Ji-Hyun Jang, Seth L. Young, Edwin L. Thomas, Mary C. Boyce and Vladimir V. Tsukruk

      Article first published online: 23 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200801675

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Periodic microporous structures can undergo sudden structural transformation at a critical strain when subjected to internal compressive stresses, resulting in a transformation of the initial periodic pattern. By confining the stress to localized porous areas complex microscopic periodic structures can be obtained. The control over the mechanical instabilities in periodic porous solids at a sub-micrometer scale demonstrated here suggests the potential mechanical tunability of photonic, transport, adhesive, and phononic properties of such porous solids.

    12. A General Approach to Semimetallic, Ultra-High-Resolution, Electron-Beam Resists (pages 1437–1443)

      Bao-Yu Zong, Gu-Chang Han, Yuan-Kai Zheng, Li-Hua An, Tie Liu, Ke-Bin Li, Jin-Jun Qiu, Zai-Bing Guo, Ping Luo, Hao-Min Wang and Bo Liu

      Article first published online: 16 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800939

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Commercial e-beam resists are modified into semimetallic resists by doping with 1–3 nm metal particles; this improves their resolution, contrast, and dry-etching resistance. With these modified positive- and negative-tone resists, fine resist patterns from electron-beam (e-beam) lithography are readily converted into high quality of 5–50 nm multilayer metallic sensors via ion-beam etching (see figure).

    13. Signal-On Electrochemiluminescence Biosensors Based on CdS–Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite for the Sensitive Detection of Choline and Acetylcholine (pages 1444–1450)

      Xiao-Fei Wang, Yi Zhou, Jing-Juan Xu and Hong-Yuan Chen

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200801313

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      CdS nanocrystals formed in situ on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes can react with H2O2, which is a product in most oxidase reactions, to generate strong and stable ECL emission. Thus, a signal-on ECL enzyme biosensor based on CdS NCs-MWCNTs nanocomposite is demonstrated for the sensing of choline and acetylcholine.

    14. Stabilization of PbS Nanocrystals by Bovine Serum Albumin in its Native and Denatured States (pages 1451–1458)

      Mandeep Singh Bakshi, Pankaj Thakur, Gurinder Kaur, Harpreet Kaur, Tarlok Singh Banipal, Fred Possmayer and Nils O. Petersen

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200801212

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      BSA in its native and denatured states is used in the synthesis of PbS nanocrystals to design bionanomaterials. The denatured state proves to be quite effective in controlling the crystal shape and structure. This is the first report that clearly indicates that crystal growth depends on the native as opposed to the denatured state of proteins and helps to understand the complex capping behavior of proteins during the fabrication of shape controlled bioconjugate nanomaterials.

    15. Enhanced Performance of Fullerene n-Channel Field-Effect Transistors with Titanium Sub-Oxide Injection Layer (pages 1459–1464)

      Shinuk Cho, Jung Hwa Seo, Kwanghee Lee and Alan J. Heeger

      Article first published online: 26 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200900189

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Enhanced performance of fullerene organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) is demonstrated by introducing a TiOx injection layer that essentially eliminates the contact resistance between the electrodes and the active layer. The TiOx layer also serves to protect the device against penetration of O2 and H2O, and thereby leads to a significant improvement in the lifetime of OFETs when exposed to air.

  7. Correction

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Full Papers
    8. Correction
    9. Index
    1. You have free access to this content
      Soft Nanopatterning on Light-Emitting Inorganic-Organic Composites

      Luana Persano, Sandra Molle, Salvatore Girardo, Antonio A. R. Neves, Andrea Camposeo, Ripalta Stabile, Roberto Cingolani and Dario Pisignan

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200990037

      This article corrects:

      Soft Nanopatterning on Light-Emitting Inorganic–Organic Composites1

      Vol. 18, Issue 18, 2692–2698, Article first published online: 1 SEP 2008

  8. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Full Papers
    8. Correction
    9. Index

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