Advanced Functional Materials

Cover image for Vol. 20 Issue 1

January 8, 2010

Volume 20, Issue 1

Pages 3–171

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Printable Electronics: Foldable Printed Circuit Boards on Paper Substrates (Adv. Funct. Mater. 1/2010)

      Adam C. Siegel, Scott T. Phillips, Michael D. Dickey, Nanshu Lu, Zhigang Suo and George M. Whitesides

      Version of Record online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200990114

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lightweight and flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) have been produced by micro-patterning metal on paper substrates, as reported by Siegel et al. on page 28. Paper-based electronic devices can be folded and creased repeatedly, shaped to form three-dimensional structures, integrated with paper-based microfluidic devices, and disposed of by flame (as shown in the cover image).

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Biosensors: (Adv. Funct. Mater. 1/2010)

      Version of Record online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200990116

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The inside cover portrays the work of Dorvel et al., who describe the formation of monofunctional organosilane monolayers via vapor phase deposition onto microarray glass slides on page 89. The deposition method then allows for subnanometer level biointerfacing of target proteins to the surface. This subnanometer interfacing method shows promise for the creation of biosensor platforms with higher sensitivity due to higher linker densities and reduction of background noise.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Ten Years of Advanced Functional Materials (pages 11–12)

      Dave Flanagan

      Version of Record online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200902270

  5. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Estimating the Maximum Attainable Efficiency in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 13–19)

      Henry J. Snaith

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901476

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      For the current state-of-the-art dye-sensitized solar cell, the loss-in-potential from the optical bandgap to the open-circuit voltage is 0.75 eV. This results in a maximum efficiency of 13.4% with an absorption onset at 840 nm. By reducing this loss-in-potential to 0.4 eV the efficiency will increase to 20.25% employing a sensitizer with an absorption onset at 940 nm.

  6. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. (Adv. Funct. Mater. 1/2010)

      Version of Record online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200990115

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract
  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Spontaneous Current Oscillations during Hard Anodization of Aluminum under Potentiostatic Conditions (pages 21–27)

      Woo Lee, Jae-Cheon Kim and Ulrich Gösele

      Version of Record online: 8 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901213

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spontaneous current oscillations during hard anodization of aluminum and their implication to the pore structures of the resulting anodic oxide are investigated. Nanoporous anodic alumina exhibits modulated pore structures as a result of self-induced oscillatory kinetic behavior, in which the modulation patterns follow exactly the details of oscillating current profile. The origin of the spontaneous current oscillations is proposed.

    2. Foldable Printed Circuit Boards on Paper Substrates (pages 28–35)

      Adam C. Siegel, Scott T. Phillips, Michael D. Dickey, Nanshu Lu, Zhigang Suo and George M. Whitesides

      Version of Record online: 15 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901363

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper describes several low-cost methods for fabricating flexible electronic circuits on paper substrates. Paper-based circuits are thin, lightweight, porous, and in contrast to conventional printed circuit board technologies, can be cut using scissors, folded and creased (repeatedly), shaped to form three-dimensional structures, and disposed of by incineration. Applications of these circuits are foreseen in consumer packaging, point-of-care diagnostics, and single-use electronics.

    3. Light-Triggered Self-Assembly of a Spiropyran-Functionalized Dendron into Nano-/Micrometer-Sized Particles and Photoresponsive Organogel with Switchable Fluorescence (pages 36–42)

      Qun Chen, Yu Feng, Deqing Zhang, Guanxin Zhang, Qinghua Fan, Shuna Sun and Daoben Zhu

      Version of Record online: 26 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901358

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A spiropyran-functionalized dendron is found to form organogels or nano-/microparticles, depending on temperature and illumination conditions. The functionalized spiropyran in both aggregates shows distinctive absorption and fluorescence spectra under alternating UV and visible light illumination. The organogel can be used as a semisolid material for light pattern recording.

    4. Polyphenylene Dendrimer-Templated In Situ Construction of Inorganic–Organic Hybrid Rice-Shaped Architectures (pages 43–49)

      Xiaoying Qi, Can Xue, Xiao Huang, Yizhong Huang, Xiaozhu Zhou, Hai Li, Daojun Liu, Freddy Boey, Qingyu Yan, Wei Huang, Steven De Feyter, Klaus Müllen and Hua Zhang

      Version of Record online: 26 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200900982

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The in situ construction of ordered inorganic–organic CuO–G2Td(COOH)16 rice-shaped architectures is demonstrated. The hybrid architectures exhibit an analogous monocrystalline structure, and the primary CuO nanoparticles are linked by rigid G2Td(COOH)16 dendrimers.

    5. Variable Temperature Mobility Analysis of n-Channel, p-Channel, and Ambipolar Organic Field-Effect Transistors (pages 50–58)

      Joseph A. Letizia, Jonathan Rivnay, Antonio Facchetti, Mark A. Ratner and Tobin J. Marks

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200900831

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The temperature dependence of field-effect-transistor mobility is analyzed for a series of n-channel, p-channel, and ambipolar organic semiconductors. Fits of the effective mobility (µeff) data within a multiple trapping and release model reveal activation energies from 21 to 70 meV. Calculated free carrier mobilities (µ0) are ∼0.2–0.8 cm2 V−1 s−1 in this materials set, largely independent of µeff.

    6. Capsosomes with Multilayered Subcompartments: Assembly and Loading with Hydrophobic Cargo (pages 59–66)

      Leticia Hosta-Rigau, Brigitte Städler, Yan Yan, Edouard Collins Nice, Joan K. Heath, Fernando Albericio and Frank Caruso

      Version of Record online: 26 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901297

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Capsosomes, polymer capsules containing liposomes, are engineered to contain multiple liposome layers, thus providing a means to tune liposome loading. Drug-loaded capsosomes are formed by entrapping the antitumor hydrophobic peptide thiocoraline within the lipid membrane of the liposomal subcompartments. The drug-loaded capsosomes show anti-tumor activity, as verified by a cell viability assay using a cancer cell line.

    7. Novel Magnetic Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles as Non-Viral Vectors for the Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene (pages 67–77)

      Hsi-Chin Wu, Tzu-Wei Wang, Martha C. Bohn, Feng-Huei Lin and Myron Spector

      Version of Record online: 9 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901108

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Magnetic synthetic hydroxyapatite and natural bone mineral nanoparticles are synthesized as non-viral vectors for gene delivery. The magnetic calcium phosphate nanoparticles display a high binding affinity for plasmid DNA in contrast to magnetite nanoparticles and enable substantial increases in the transfection of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro with the gene for a neurotrophic factor, under the action of an external magnet.

    8. Highly Stable Au Nanoparticles with Tunable Spacing and Their Potential Application in Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensors (pages 78–86)

      Shuyan Gao, Naoto Koshizaki, Hideo Tokuhisa, Emiko Koyama, Takeshi Sasaki, Jae-Kwan Kim, Joonghyun Ryu, Deok-Soo Kim and Yoshiki Shimizu

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901232

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An innovative colloidal Au-amplified surface plasmon resonance (SPR) transducer is achieved by a using remarkably stable and space-tunable Au/Al2O3 nanocomposite film. This study indicates that the Au/Al2O3 nanocomposite film is very promising; it simultaneously overcomes the instability and uncontrollable interparticle distance, which are the current bottlenecks hampering the application of SPR sensors.

    9. Vapor-Phase Deposition of Monofunctional Alkoxysilanes for Sub-Nanometer-Level Biointerfacing on Silicon Oxide Surfaces (pages 87–95)

      Brian Dorvel, Bobby Reddy Jr., Ian Block, Patrick Mathias, Susan E. Clare, Brian Cunningham, Donald E. Bergstrom and Rashid Bashir

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901688

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Vapor phase deposition of monofunctional alkoxysilanes results in highly dense and highly uniform subnanometer monolayers. These monolayers can be applied to all types of silicon oxide surfaces for interfacing applications. A major application may be in microarray work, where the uniformity across slides is excellent and there is little to no background contribution from the monolayer.

  8. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. (Adv. Funct. Mater. 1/2010)

      Version of Record online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200990118

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract
  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Feature Article
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Efficiency Enhancement in Organic Photovoltaic Cells: Consequences of Optimizing Series Resistance (pages 97–104)

      Jonathan D. Servaites, Sina Yeganeh, Tobin J. Marks and Mark A. Ratner

      Version of Record online: 8 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901107

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Efficiency enhancement in organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells is studied via optimizing the series resistance (Rs). It is shown that current bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) OPVs are approaching the limit for which efficiency can be improved via Rs reduction alone. The evaluation addresses OPVs based on a poly(3-hexylthiophene):6,6-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester active layer. A projected high-efficiency (>10%) scenario is also considered and shown to have greater, but modest, Rs losses. Finally, for moderate to large cell sizes (> ≈ 0.1 cm2), it is shown that the anode resistance dominates Rs losses.

    2. Sensing of Alkylating Agents Using Organic Field-Effect Transistors (pages 105–110)

      Yair Gannot, Carmit Hertzog-Ronen, Nir Tessler and Yoav Eichen

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901598

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel polythiophene derivative containing pyridine side-groups that can react with alkylating agents is prepared and characterized. By attaching the pyridine group to the conjugated backbone, the conductivity of the polymer becomes sensitive to alkylation. By fabricating field-effect transistors with the polythiophene derivative as its channel, a device that can distinguish alkylators from other “innocent” vapors is produced.

    3. Enhanced Adsorption of Ammonia on Metal-Organic Framework/Graphite Oxide Composites: Analysis of Surface Interactions (pages 111–118)

      Camille Petit and Teresa J. Bandosz

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200900880

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Graphite oxide (GO)/metal-organic framework (MOF-5) nanocomposites are tested as adsorbents for ammonia. A synergetic effect in their adsorption capacity is observed owing to the enhanced dispersive forces present at the interface between the MOF-5 segments and the graphene layers. Besides physisorption, ammonia is retained by intercalation between the graphene layers and hydrogen bonding with the zinc oxide clusters in MOF-5.

    4. Variations in Hole Injection due to Fast and Slow Interfacial Traps in Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes with Interlayers (pages 119–130)

      M. James Harding, Dmitry Poplavskyy, Vi-En Choong, Franky So and Alasdair J. Campbell

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200900352

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In the negligible-barrier regime, hole injection from PEDOT:PSS into conjugated polymers, both with and without an intervening 10 nm thick interlayer, can fall below its theoretical value by up to two orders of magnitude. This is due to fast and slow charge trapping in the region of the anode, which must be related to the morphology of the interfacial layers. In the figure, JTFSCLC and JDC represent the trap-free space-charge limited and the measured steady-state DC currents.

    5. Rapid Generation of Biologically Relevant Hydrogels Containing Long-Range Chemical Gradients (pages 131–137)

      Jiankang He, Yanan Du, José L. Villa-Uribe, Changmo Hwang, Dichen Li and Ali Khademhosseini

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901311

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple fluidic-based approach for rapidly engineering materials containing centimeter-long gradients of chemical properties is demonstrated. As an example, a gradient poly(ethylene glycol)- diacrylate (PEG-DA) hydrogel fabricated in a microfluidic channel with continuous variance in thickness (after air-drying) or porosity (after freeze-drying) is shown (see figure).

    6. Red-Emitting Polyfluorenes Grafted with Quinoline-Based Iridium Complex: “Simple Polymeric Chain, Unexpected High Efficiency” (pages 138–146)

      Zhihua Ma, Junqiao Ding, Baohua Zhang, Chongyu Mei, Yanxiang Cheng, Zhiyuan Xie, Lixiang Wang, Xiabin Jing and Fosong Wang

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901595

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Red-emitting electrophosphorescent polymers are developed by covalently linking a quinoline-based iridium complex to the side chain of polyfluorene. In devices based on the complex containing this simple polymeric chain, which consists of no additional carrier-transporting moieties, unexpected high efficiencies are attained because of a much improved charge balance (see figure).

    7. Antioxidant Activity of Degradable Polymer Poly(trolox ester) to Suppress Oxidative Stress Injury in the Cells (pages 147–154)

      Paritosh P. Wattamwar, Yiqun Mo, Rong Wan, Roshan Palli, Qunwei Zhang and Thomas D. Dziubla

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200900839

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A therapeutic antioxidant polymer, poly- (trolox) (PTx), is synthesized by esterification of trolox, a synthetic water-soluble analogue of Vitamin E. PTx nanoparticles (NPs) have very little to no cytotoxicity and can protect cells from metal-nanoparticle (Nano Co)-induced oxidative injury. In vitro studies suggest that PTx nanoparticles undergo enzyme-mediated degradation, which releases the active antioxidants.

    8. Exciton–Exciton Annihilation in Mixed-Phase Polyfluorene Films (pages 155–161)

      Paul E. Shaw, Arvydas Ruseckas, Jeffrey Peet, Guillermo C. Bazan and Ifor D. W. Samuel

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200900879

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Exciton diffusion is investigated in polyfluorene (PFO) films containing varying fractions of chains in the β-phase conformation through measurements of the exciton–exciton annihilation rate. The annihilation rate is found to gradually increase with increasing β-phase fraction, indicating that exciton diffusion is faster in the β-phase than in the glassy phase. The trend is consistent with β-phase chains uniformly dispersed throughout the glassy phase.

    9. High-Strain Shape-Memory Polymers (pages 162–171)

      Walter Voit, Taylor Ware, Raghunath R. Dasari, Paul Smith, Lauren Danz, Dustin Simon, Stephen Barlow, Seth R. Marder and Ken Gall

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901409

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fully recoverable strains up to more than 800% are demonstrated by shape-memory polymers. In addition, a new hybrid molecule, a crosslinker and photoinitiator (nicknamed Xini) was developed to synthesize novel polymers with memory behavior. The large strain capacity of a specific thermoset composition of poly(methyl acrylate-co-isobornyl acrylate-co-bisphenol A ethoxylate dimethacrylate) is shown.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION