Advanced Functional Materials

Cover image for Vol. 20 Issue 15

August 9, 2010

Volume 20, Issue 15

Pages 2371–2538

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
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    4. Contents
    5. Comment
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    1. Nanotubes: A Closer Look Inside Nanotubes: Pore Structure Evaluation of Anodized Alumina Templated Carbon Nanotube Membranes Through Adsorption and Permeability Studies (Adv. Funct. Mater. 15/2010)

      Georgios Pilatos, Eleni C. Vermisoglou, Georgios E. Romanos, Georgios N. Karanikolos, Nikos Boukos, Vlassis Likodimos and Nick K. Kanellopoulos

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201090063

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      In the “heart” of nanotubes. The internal morphology of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is assessed by investigating the permeability and adsorption behavior of selected gases and vapors through CNTs that have been grown inside the channels of an anodized alumina template, as presented by G. E. Romanos, G. N. Karanikolos, and co-workers on page 2500. The cover illustrates template-free aligned CNTs in a heart-like configuration. Internal restrictions, surface roughness, hollow space narrowing, and other inside-tubes characteristics are determined that are crucial in CNT storage and flow-through applications.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Comment
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    1. Nanomotors: Magnetic Control of Tubular Catalytic Microbots for the Transport, Assembly, and Delivery of Micro-objects (Adv. Funct. Mater. 15/2010)

      Alexander A. Solovev, Samuel Sanchez, Martin Pumera, Yong Feng Mei and Oliver G. Schmidt

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201090064

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      S. Sanchez, Y. F. Mei, and co-workers present the concept of a microfactory on page 2430, where micro-objects are mixed together with synthetic microbots in a fluid and fuel is added in order to power them, as shown in the image. The motion of these microbots is remotely controlled by magnetic field that is an essential requirement for specialized tasks such as transport and delivery of microscale loads.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Comment
    6. Feature Article
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
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  4. Comment

    1. Top of page
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    1. Comment on “MEL-type Pure-Silica Zeolite Nanocrystals Prepared by an Evaporation-Assisted Two-Stage Synthesis Method as Ultra-Low-k Materials” (pages 2377–2379)

      Salvador Eslava, Jin W. Seo, Christine E.A. Kirschhock, Mikhail R. Baklanov, Karen Maex and Johan A. Martens

      Version of Record online: 7 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201000114

  5. Feature Article

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    1. Dynamic Magnetic Properties of Ferroic Films, Multilayers, and Patterned Elements (pages 2380–2394)

      Robert L. Stamps

      Version of Record online: 23 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201000310

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      Strategies for controlling useful electromagnetic properties by patterning magnetic materials are highlighted, with an emphasis on how surface and interface effects modify dynamics. Examples are given of recent advances in controlling linear and nonlinear microwave properties important for magnonics. Domain wall dynamics and their control using patterned arrays are also discussed, with reference to potential applications for spin electronics.

  6. Frontispiece

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    1. Micropatterning: Patterned Hydrogels for Controlled Platelet Adhesion from Whole Blood and Plasma (Adv. Funct. Mater. 15/2010)

      Tobias Ekblad, Lars Faxälv, Olof Andersson, Nanny Wallmark, Andréas Larsson, Tomas L. Lindahl and Bo Liedberg

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201090066

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      Poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogel coatings patterned with selected proteins can be utilized to control and study the adhesion of human blood platelets with excellent precision, as presented by B. Liedberg et al. on page 2396. This frontispiece shows how imaging surface plasmon resonance is used in combination with fluorescence microscopy to investigate the platelet adhesion process in undiluted blood plasma.

  7. Full Papers

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    1. Patterned Hydrogels for Controlled Platelet Adhesion from Whole Blood and Plasma (pages 2396–2403)

      Tobias Ekblad, Lars Faxälv, Olof Andersson, Nanny Wallmark, Andréas Larsson, Tomas L. Lindahl and Bo Liedberg

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201000083

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      Patterned hydrogels with ultralow protein adsorption and specifically immobilized bioactive ligands provide ideal substrates for diagnosis of platelet function. The platelet–surface interactions are studied in situ in blood plasma by imaging surface plasmon resonance. Platelets adhere to the sections of the hydrogel pattern with immobilized ligand but not to the surrounding inert hydrogel.

    2. Stable Inverted Polymer/Fullerene Solar Cells Using a Cationic Polythiophene Modified PEDOT:PSS Cathodic Interface (pages 2404–2415)

      David A. Rider, Brian J. Worfolk, Kenneth D. Harris, Abeed Lalany, Kevin Shahbazi, Michael D. Fleischauer, Michael J. Brett and Jillian M. Buriak

      Version of Record online: 21 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201000304

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      The electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly of a cationic polythiophene with either colloidal suspensions of anionic (PEDOT:PSS) or electrochemically prepared (PEDOT:PSS) films on ITO is established. The hybrid films act as interfacial modifiers for ITO and enable efficient, long-lived inverted polymer/fullerene photovoltaics.

    3. Nanogold-Loaded Sharp-Edged Carbon Bullets as Plant-Gene Carriers (pages 2416–2423)

      Periyasamy S. Vijayakumar, Othalathara U. Abhilash, Bashir M. Khan and Bhagavatula L. V. Prasad

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901883

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      Nanogold-embedded carbon particles prepared by heat treatment of biogenic intracellular gold nanoparticles are shown to be effective delivery vehicles of DNA into different plants. Due to the sharp edges of the carbon support, very minimal damage to the plant cell is observed, with enhanced plant regeneration and transformation efficiencies compared with the commercial micrometer-sized spherical gold particles.

    4. Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity using Layer-by-Layer Electrospun Constructs for Water Remediation (pages 2424–2429)

      Jung Ah Lee, Yoon Sung Nam, Gregory C. Rutledge and Paula T. Hammond

      Version of Record online: 23 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201000418

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      A layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition approach for immobilizing TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) to sustain their catalytic efficiency for photochemical decomposition of bisphenol A in water treatment applications is presented. Anatase TiO2 NPs ∼7 nm in diameter self-assemble in consecutive layers with positively charged polyhedral oligosilsesquioxanes on a highly porous electrospun polymer fiber mesh.

    5. Magnetic Control of Tubular Catalytic Microbots for the Transport, Assembly, and Delivery of Micro-objects (pages 2430–2435)

      Alexander A. Solovev, Samuel Sanchez, Martin Pumera, Yong Feng Mei and Oliver G. Schmidt

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200902376

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      The magnetic control of self-propelled catalytic microtubes (microbots) is described. These microbots are used for the selectively loading, transport, and delivery of microscale objects. As they are self-propelled by ejecting microbubbles via the platinum catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water their motion can be fully controlled by an external magnetic field.

    6. Crossing an Interface: Ferroelectric Control of Tunnel Currents in Magnetic Complex Oxide Heterostructures (pages 2436–2441)

      Michael Hambe, Adrian Petraru, Nikolay A. Pertsev, Paul Munroe, Valanoor Nagarajan and Hermann Kohlstedt

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201000265

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      A series of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) curves before and after the application of ferroelectric switching bias is presented. The figure represents the tunable TMR that was obtained in a ferromagnetic/ferroelectric/ferromagnetic tunnel junction via the application of short electric field pulses. These pulses induce polarization reversal in the barrier, thereby affecting the complex band structure at the interfaces.

    7. Hollow Mesoporous Zirconia Nanocapsules for Drug Delivery (pages 2442–2447)

      Shaoheng Tang, Xiaoqing Huang, Xiaolan Chen and Nanfeng Zheng

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201000647

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      Inorganic nanocapsules improve anticancer drug delivery:Highly biocompatible hollow mesoporous ZrO2 nanospheres exhibit high loading capacity of doxorubicin. DOX loaded ZrO2 nanocapsules release more drugs in cancer cells than in normal cells, therefore displaying more cytotoxicity toward tumor cells and less cytotoxicity to normal cells than free DOX.

    8. Stable, Glassy, and Versatile Binaphthalene Derivatives Capable of Efficient Hole Transport, Hosting, and Deep-Blue Light Emission (pages 2448–2458)

      Bin Wei, Ji-Zhong Liu, Yong Zhang, Jian-Hua Zhang, Hua-Nan Peng, He-Liang Fan, Yan-Bo He and Xi-Cun Gao

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201000299

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      Binaphthalene derivatives are synthesized: they form very stable, “melting-point-less,” glassy, amorphous films that have high degradation temperatures. They are efficient and versatile OLED materials: they can be used as a hole-transport layer, a host and a deep-blue-light-emitting material. The deep-blue electroluminescence remains very stable at very-high current densities up to 1000 mA cm−2.

    9. Synthesis of Core–Shell Inorganic Nanotubes (pages 2459–2468)

      Ronen Kreizman, Andrey N. Enyashin, Francis Leonard Deepak, Ana Albu-Yaron, Ronit Popovitz-Biro, Gotthard Seifert and Reshef Tenne

      Version of Record online: 30 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201000490

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      A core–shell inorganic nanotubular structure is synthesized applying a WS2 nanotube as a template. The guest material, in this case MoS2, can be distinguished in the TEM from its host material (template) by its contrast and inter-layer distance. Chemical analysis tools (e.g., EDS and EELS) are also utilized to confirm the presence of guest elements.

  8. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Comment
    6. Feature Article
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Full Papers
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    1. Electro-Optical Materials: Electrically Addressable Hybrid Architectures of Zinc Oxide Nanowires Grown on Aligned Carbon Nanotubes (Adv. Funct. Mater. 15/2010)

      Jong G. Ok, Sameh H. Tawfick, K. Anne Juggernauth, Kai Sun, Yongyi Zhang and A. John Hart

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201090067

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      Hybrid assemblies of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are presented by A. J. Hart et al. on page 2470. The foreground shows a transmission electron micrograph of an individual hybrid bundle where the ZnO nanowires extend radially from the surface of the CNTs. The background shows a scanning electron micrograph of the sidewall of a ZnO/CNT hybrid forest. Color was added using Adobe Photoshop.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
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    1. Electrically Addressable Hybrid Architectures of Zinc Oxide Nanowires Grown on Aligned Carbon Nanotubes (pages 2470–2480)

      Jong G. Ok, Sameh H. Tawfick, K. Anne Juggernauth, Kai Sun, Yongyi Zhang and A. John Hart

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201000249

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      3D hybrid architectures (a,b) of ZnO nanowires and aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are created using a two-step CVD process. Large-area thin films demonstrate c) anisotropic electrical transport along with Ohmic contact between the ZnO and CNTs, and d) rapid photoelectric response upon UV illumination.

    2. Aligning Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes By Means Of Langmuir–Blodgett Film Deposition: Optical, Morphological, and Photo-electrochemical Studies (pages 2481–2488)

      Gabriele Giancane, Andrés Ruland, Vito Sgobba, Daniela Manno, Antonio Serra, Gianluca M. Farinola, Omar Hassan Omar, Dirk M. Guldi and Ludovico Valli

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201000290

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      An alkoxy-substituted poly(phenylene thiophene) is used to suspend SWCNTs in dichloroethane. The polymer/CNT blend is transferred onto solid substrates using the Langmuir–Blodgett technique. Exposure to soft X-rays evidences highly organized structures of bundles of carbon nanotubes. The Langmuir–Blodgett layers transferred on ITO substrates are tested as photocathodes in a photo-electrochemical cell.

    3. The Influence of Surface Chemistry and Pore Size on the Adsorption of Proteins on Nanostructured Carbon Materials (pages 2489–2499)

      Munusami Vijayaraj, Roger Gadiou, Karine Anselme, Camelia Ghimbeu, Cathie Vix-Guterl, Hironori Orikasa, Takashi Kyotani and Sumlak Ittisanronnachai

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201000288

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      Carbon films with nanochannels are synthesized by templating of porous aluminum oxide films. These materials exhibit pores with a well-controlled size and shape, and the surface chemistry of these films is modified by chemical and physical treatments. The reversible and irreversible adsorption of two proteins (bovine serum albumin and cytochrome c) on these materials is then studied as a function of pore size and surface chemistry.

    4. A Closer Look Inside Nanotubes: Pore Structure Evaluation of Anodized Alumina Templated Carbon Nanotube Membranes Through Adsorption and Permeability Studies (pages 2500–2510)

      Georgios Pilatos, Eleni C. Vermisoglou, Georgios E. Romanos, Georgios N. Karanikolos, Nikos Boukos, Vlassis Likodimos and Nick K. Kanellopoulos

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200901429

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      A combinational toolset of adsorption, permeability, and relative permeability is employed to investigate the internal characteristics of the pores of CNT membranes. Based on the findings, the internal structure of the CNT pores throughout their length is elucidated, which cannot be accurately evaluated by electron microscopy data.

    5. Self-Assembled In-Plane Growth of Mg2SiO4 Nanowires on Si Substrates Catalyzed by Au Nanoparticles (pages 2511–2518)

      Zhou Zhang, Lai Mun Wong, Hou Xiao Wang, Zhi Peng Wei, Wei Zhou, Shi Jie Wang and Tom Wu

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201000442

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      Self-assembled in-plane Mg2SiO4 nanowires are synthesized on Si substrates using Au nanoparticles as catalyst. Besides serving as the supporting substrates, Si actively takes part in the vapor–liquid–solid growth of the nanowires. The epitaxial growth also confines the nanowires along the Si <110> directions on Si (110), (100), and (111) substrates.

    6. Large-Area Nanoscale Patterning of Functional Materials by Nanomolding in Capillaries (pages 2519–2526)

      Xuexin Duan, Yiping Zhao, Erwin Berenschot, Niels R. Tas, David N. Reinhoudt and Jurriaan Huskens

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201000492

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      A high-resolution soft lithography technique—nanomolding in capillaries (NAMIC)—is developed. NAMIC is used to pattern different functional materials from their solutions such as fluorescent dyes, proteins, nanoparticles, thermoplastic polymers, and conductive polymers at the nanometer scale over large areas. The results show that NAMIC is a simple, versatile, low-cost, and high-throughput nanopatterning tool.

    7. Surface Nanometer-Scale Patterning in Realizing Large-Scale Ordered Arrays of Metallic Nanoshells with Well-Defined Structures and Controllable Properties (pages 2527–2533)

      Shikuan Yang, Weiping Cai, Lingce Kong and Yong Lei

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201000467

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      Ordered arrays of Ag nanoshells with controllable structural parameters (including intershell spacing, diameter, and the surface roughness) are prepared on substrates using an innovative surface nanopatterning technique. A polystyrene sphere monolayer is used as the electrophoretic template for fabricating the Ag nanoshell arrays. The properties of the nanoshell arrays can be controlled based on the adjustment of the structural parameters.

    8. A Gene Therapy Technology-Based Biomaterial for the Trigger-Inducible Release of Biopharmaceuticals in Mice (pages 2534–2538)

      Michael M. Kämpf, Erik H. Christen, Martin Ehrbar, Marie Daoud-El Baba, Ghislaine Charpin-El Hamri, Martin Fussenegger and Wilfried Weber

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200902377

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      An implantable small molecule-triggered hydrogel for the inducible release of biopharmaceuticals in mice is reported. The hydrogel consists of polyacrylamide crosslinked by a homodimeric variant of the human FK-binding protein (FM). Dimeric FM is dissociated by the small molecule drug FK506 resulting in hydrogel dissolution and the adjustable release of the previously embedded model biopharmaceutical VEGF.

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