Advanced Functional Materials

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 39

October 18, 2013

Volume 23, Issue 39

Pages 4873–4984

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      Magnetic Nanoparticles: Quantitative Recovery of Magnetic Nanoparticles from Flowing Blood: Trace Analysis and the Role of Magnetization (Adv. Funct. Mater. 39/2013) (page 4873)

      Christoph M. Schumacher, Inge K. Herrmann, Stephanie B. Bubenhofer, Sabrina Gschwind, Ann-Marie Hirt, Beatrice Beck-Schimmer, Detlef Günther and Wendelin J. Stark

      Version of Record online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201370193

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      High magnetic responsiveness is critical for nanomagnets in biomedicine, and fast and complete separation is essential for blood purification or targeted drug delivery, to diminish potential risks. However, studies on the collection efficiency of iron-based nanoparticles are rare. On page 4888, W. J. Stark and co-workers present a new quantification approach based on platinum doping of magnetite and carbon-coated cementite nanoparticles. Their findings show that a good separation efficiency from human whole blood calls for nanomaterials with high saturation magnetizations.

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      Flexible Transistors: Flexible Nonvolatile Transistor Memory Devices Based on One-Dimensional Electrospun P3HT:Au Hybrid Nanofibers (Adv. Funct. Mater. 39/2013) (page 4874)

      Hsuan-Chun Chang, Cheng-Liang Liu and Wen-Chang Chen

      Version of Record online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201370194

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      Electrospun P3HT:Au hybrid nanofibers are employed by W.-C. Chen and co-workers to fabricate a nonvolatile transistor memory device. On page 4960, using hybrid semiconducting nanofiber as channels and functionalized Au nanoparitcles as potential wells, it is demonstrated how charges can be stored or erased. The controllable storage density of high-performance hybrid nanofiber devices could be used in future plastic information storage.

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      Masthead: (Adv. Funct. Mater. 39/2013)

      Version of Record online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201370195

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      Self-Assembly: Formation of Functionalized Nanowires by Control of Self-Assembly Using Multiple Modified Amyloid Peptides (Adv. Funct. Mater. 39/2013) (page 4880)

      Hiroki Sakai, Ken Watanabe, Yuya Asanomi, Yumiko Kobayashi, Yoshiro Chuman, Lihong Shi, Takuya Masuda, Thomas Wyttenbach, Michael T. Bowers, Kohei Uosaki and Kazuyasu Sakaguchi

      Version of Record online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201370197

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      Functionalized nanowires derived from amyloid peptides are formed in a straightforward manner with remarkable control by K. Sakaguchi and co-workers. Mixing multiple modified amyloid peptides with a specific three-amino-acid residue cap drastically enhances the self-assembly. On page 4881, the enhancement affects the both steps of small oligomer formation and macroscopic fibrillization. This facile method is also effective for probe-containing peptides, thus expanding the possibilities for creating diverse classes of functionalized nanowires.

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    1. Formation of Functionalized Nanowires by Control of Self-Assembly Using Multiple Modified Amyloid Peptides (pages 4881–4887)

      Hiroki Sakai, Ken Watanabe, Yuya Asanomi, Yumiko Kobayashi, Yoshiro Chuman, Lihong Shi, Takuya Masuda, Thomas Wyttenbach, Michael T. Bowers, Kohei Uosaki and Kazuyasu Sakaguchi

      Version of Record online: 23 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201300577

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      Straightforward preparation of various functionalized or inorganic nanowires can be achieved by a very simple method based on mixing structurally related modified amyloid peptides, which allows effective control of self-assembly. The peptides contain three-amino-acid-residue units that provide remarkable control during the entire self-assembly process, starting from a small oligomer up to the macroscopic fibril level.

    2. Quantitative Recovery of Magnetic Nanoparticles from Flowing Blood: Trace Analysis and the Role of Magnetization (pages 4888–4896)

      Christoph M. Schumacher, Inge K. Herrmann, Stephanie B. Bubenhofer, Sabrina Gschwind, Ann-Marie Hirt, Beatrice Beck-Schimmer, Detlef Günther and Wendelin J. Stark

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201300696

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      The responsiveness to external magnetic fields is a critical parameter for the successful application of nanomagnets in biomedicine, as fast and complete magnetic separations are essential. Here, the superior separation performance of strongly magnetizable carbon-coated cementite nanoparticles over magnetite nanomagnets from stagnant/flowing human blood is shown. Beyond, a robust quantification approach for iron-based nanomaterials in iron-rich matrices is presented.

    3. Bright Blue Solution Processed Triple-Layer Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes Realized by Thermal Layer Stabilization and Orthogonal Solvents (pages 4897–4905)

      Roman Trattnig, Leonid Pevzner, Monika Jäger, Raphael Schlesinger, Marco Vittorio Nardi, Giovanni Ligorio, Christos Christodoulou, Norbert Koch, Martin Baumgarten, Klaus Müllen and Emil J. W. List

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201300360

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      A conceptual study on triple-layer PLEDs fabricated by successive solution based deposition of multiple polymer layers without extensively redissolving of existing layers is shown. Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) measurements of the triple-layer assembly reveal a favorable energy level alignment at the respective material interfaces resulting in a charge carrier confinement in the emitting layer, thus enhancing maximum luminance and luminous efficiency values.

    4. Extracellular Matrix Control of Collagen Mineralization In Vitro (pages 4906–4912)

      Alexander J. Lausch, Bryan D. Quan, Jason W. Miklas and Eli D. Sone

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201203760

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      A novel model of collagen biomineralization is presented, based on deposition of mineral from metastable calcium and phosphate-containing solutions into demineralized sections of mouse periodontal tissues. Mineral deposits selectively into natively mineralized tissues of the tooth root with high fidelity, mimicking the pattern of mineralization in vivo, and demonstrating that the extracellular matrix of these tissues retains sufficient information to control collagen mineralization.

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      Organic Leds: Exciplex-Forming Co-host for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Ultimate Efficiency (Adv. Funct. Mater. 39/2013) (page 4913)

      Young-Seo Park, Sunghun Lee, Kwon-Hyeon Kim, Sei-Yong Kim, Jeong-Hwan Lee and Jang-Joo Kim

      Version of Record online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201370198

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      On page 4914, J.-J. Kim and co-workers use an exciplex-forming co-host to create phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes with ultimate efficiencies reported in terms of the external quantum efficiency (EQE), driving voltage, and efficiency rolloff. The image expresses the formation of an exciplex by the recombination of an electron and a hole, followed by energy transfer from the exciplex-forming co-host to the dopant, and the luminescence of the green light from the dopant.

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    1. Exciplex-Forming Co-host for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Ultimate Efficiency (pages 4914–4920)

      Young-Seo Park, Sunghun Lee, Kwon-Hyeon Kim, Sei-Yong Kim, Jeong-Hwan Lee and Jang-Joo Kim

      Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201300547

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      Using an exciplex-forming co-host, an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with ultimate efficiency is produced. The OLED has a low turn-on voltage of 2.4 V, a very high external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 29.1%, a very high power efficiency of 124 lm W−1, and an extremely low efficiency roll-off. The EQE of the optimized OLED is maintained at more than 27.8%, up to 10 000 cd m−2.

    2. Self-Healing Materials via Reversible Crosslinking of Poly(ethylene oxide)-Block-Poly(furfuryl glycidyl ether) (PEO-b-PFGE) Block Copolymer Films (pages 4921–4932)

      Markus J. Barthel, Tobias Rudolph, Anke Teichler, Renzo M. Paulus, Jürgen Vitz, Stephanie Hoeppener, Martin D. Hager, Felix H. Schacher and Ulrich S. Schubert

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201300469

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      Films of poly(furfuryl glycidyl ether) (PFGE) and poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(furfuryl glycidyl ether) PEO-b-PFGE block copolymers are prepared and reversibly crosslinked by Diels-Alder chemistry. The self-healing of damaged surfaces is studied in detail with help of differential scanning calorimetry, depth-sensing indentation, small angle X-ray scattering, and profilometry.

    3. Crystalline CoFeB/Graphite Interfaces for Carbon Spintronics Fabricated by Solid Phase Epitaxy (pages 4933–4940)

      P. K. Johnny Wong, Elmer van Geijn, Wen Zhang, Anton A. Starikov, T. Lan Anh Tran, Johnny G. M. Sanderink, Martin H. Siekman, Geert Brocks, Paul J. Kelly, Wilfred G. van der Wiel and Michel P. de Jong

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201203460

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      Solid phase epitaxy of the amorphous alloy CoFeB is used to fabricate crystalline ferromagnet/graphite interfaces, which are of great interest for carbon spintronics but hardly achievable with conventional thin film deposition techniques. The heterointerface features a strong body-centred-cubic (110) texture and is free from boron accumulation upon crystallization, favorable for obtaining a high spin polarization at the CoFe/graphite interface.

    4. Development of a Seedless Floating Growth Process in Solution for Synthesis of Crystalline ZnO Micro/Nanowire Arrays on Graphene: Towards High-Performance Nanohybrid Ultraviolet Photodetectors (pages 4941–4948)

      Jianwei Liu, Rongtao Lu, Guowei Xu, Judy Wu, Prem Thapa and David Moore

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201300468

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      A seedless solution process is developed to control the morphologies and orientation of crystalline ZnO micro/nanowires on graphene sheets by face-down floating or face-up in the solution. The UV detectors based on vertically aligned ZnO micro/nanowires on graphene show high responsivity and fast response.

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      Functional Biomaterials: Highly Elastic Micropatterned Hydrogel for Engineering Functional Cardiac Tissue (Adv. Funct. Mater. 39/2013) (page 4949)

      Nasim Annabi, Kelly Tsang, Suzanne M. Mithieux, Mehdi Nikkhah, Afshin Ameri, Ali Khademhosseini and Anthony S. Weiss

      Version of Record online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201370199

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      Tropoelastin is crosslinked with methacrylation and light to make MeTro. MeTro enables encapsulation and surface interactions with cells, as shown by A. Khademhosseini, A. S. Weiss, and co-workers on page 4950. Patterned MeTro is elastic and supports the organized growth of functionally active, beating cardiomyocytes. Immunostaining shows α-sarcomeric actinin (green), connexin-43 (red), and nuclei (blue).

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    1. Highly Elastic Micropatterned Hydrogel for Engineering Functional Cardiac Tissue (pages 4950–4959)

      Nasim Annabi, Kelly Tsang, Suzanne M. Mithieux, Mehdi Nikkhah, Afshin Ameri, Ali Khademhosseini and Anthony S. Weiss

      Version of Record online: 26 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201300570

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      Highly elastic hydrogels containing well-defined micropatterns are engineered from recombinant human tropoelastin, the resilience-imparting protein found in all elastic human tissues. These elastic substrates are then used to engineer biomimetic cardiac tissue constructs. The micropatterned hydrogels support the alignment, intercellular communication, and synchronous beating of cardiomyocytes by providing an elastic mechanical support that mimics their dynamic mechanical properties in vivo (scale bar: 50 μm).

    2. Flexible Nonvolatile Transistor Memory Devices Based on One-Dimensional Electrospun P3HT:Au Hybrid Nanofibers (pages 4960–4968)

      Hsuan-Chun Chang, Cheng-Liang Liu and Wen-Chang Chen

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201300283

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      Novel flexible nonvolatile transistor memory devices based on the electrospun nanofiber of poly(3-hexylthiophene):surface-modified gold nanoparticles show a low voltage operation (±5 V), large threshold voltage shift (3.5–10.6 V), long retention times (>104 s), and good endurance properties (>100 cycles) regardless of mechanical bending stress.

    3. Assessing Antisite Defect and Impurity Concentrations in Bi2Te3 Based Thin Films by High-Accuracy Chemical Analysis (pages 4969–4976)

      Nicola Peranio, Markus Winkler, Michael Dürrschnabel, Jan König and Oliver Eibl

      Version of Record online: 26 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201300606

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      Wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (WDX) is applied to Bi2Te3 thermoelectric thin films for accurate chemical analysis. The antisite densities can thus be measured and this can be used to control the charge-carrier densities. The transport properties are compared with solutions of the linearized Boltzmann transport equation. For sputtered films, the argon concentration, which is relevant for phonon scattering, is measured.

    4. A Versatile Light-Switchable Nanorod Memory: Wurtzite ZnO on Perovskite SrTiO3 (pages 4977–4984)

      Ashok Bera, Haiyang Peng, James Lourembam, Youde Shen, Xiao Wei Sun and T. Wu

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201300509

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      An optically reconfigurable resistive switching diode is realized by growing ZnO nanorods on Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystals in solution at low temperatures. The ZnO nanorods/Nb:SrTiO3 heterojunction forms a high-quality Schottky diode that shows persistent photoconductivity and light-controlled resistive switching behaviors with highly tunable ON and OFF memory states.

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