Magnetic Nanocomposite Sol–Gel Systems for Remote Controlled Drug Release

Authors

  • Ashley M. Hawkins,

    1. Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, 177 F. Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, KY 40506-0046, USA
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  • Chelsie E. Bottom,

    1. Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, 177 F. Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, KY 40506-0046, USA
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  • Zhi Liang,

    1. Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, 177 F. Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, KY 40506-0046, USA
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  • David A. Puleo,

    1. Center for Biomedical Engineering, Unviersity of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0070, USA
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  • J. Zach Hilt

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, 177 F. Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, KY 40506-0046, USA
    • Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, 177 F. Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, KY 40506-0046, USA.

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Abstract

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The remote heating of iron oxide nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field is used to drive a thermoresponsive sol-gel block copolymer, Pluronic® F-127, through the upper phase transition temperature. This phase change triggers an accelerated release rate of a model drug. Actuation and return to baseline levels are demonstrated for multiple AMF doses.

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